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Archive for Tax Cuts Jobs Act

Tax Cuts And Jobs Act: Credits For Family Leave And Medical Expenses

Charles Woodson, Tax Credits For Family Leave And Medical Expenses

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that was passed last year included a new tax credit for employers that allows them to claim a credit based on wages paid to qualifying employees while they are on family and medical leave.

To qualify for the credit, an employer must have a written policy that provides at least two weeks of paid family and medical leave annually to all qualifying employees who work full time, which can be prorated for part-time. The wages paid during the leave period cannot be less than 50 percent of what the employee is normally paid.

The credit is variable. It begins at 12.5% and increases by 0.25%, up to a maximum of 25%, for each percentage point that the rate of payment exceeds 50% of the employee’s normal pay.

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Relocation To A New Employer: Moving Expense Deductions No Longer Allowed

Charles Woodson, Tax Advisor, Relocation Expense Deductions

Prior to the passage of tax reform, individuals who moved as the result of a job change or job relocation could deduct their unreimbursed moving expenses if the driving distance from their home to the new job location was at least 50 miles more than the driving distance from home to the old job location. There was also a requirement that the individual work in the new location for a specified minimum period of time after the move.

Unfortunately, tax reform effectively repealed that deduction after 2017, except for members of the Armed Forces on active duty who move pursuant to a military order. On top of that, if an employer reimburses the employee for the expenses—whether by paying a moving van company, airline, or other vendor directly, or by reimbursing the employee for their moving expenses—the reimbursement will be treated as taxable wages subject to withholding of income, Medicare, and Social Security taxes.

If a move is required by an employer, there is a possible workaround by having the employer include enough in the

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Tax Cuts And Jobs Acts: Impact On Businesses

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, a $1.5 trillion tax cut package, was signed into law on December 22, 2017. The centerpiece of the legislation is a permanent reduction of the corporate income tax rate. The corporate rate change and some of the other major provisions that affect businesses and business income are summarized below. Provisions take effect in tax year 2018 unless otherwise stated.

Corporate Tax Rates

  • Instead of the previous graduated corporate tax structure with four rate brackets (15%, 25%, 34%, and 35%), the new legislation establishes a single flat corporate rate of 21%.
  • The Act reduces the dividends-received deduction (corporations are allowed a deduction for dividends received from other domestic corporations) from 70% to 50%. If the corporation owns 20% or more of the company paying the dividend, the percentage is now 65%, down from 80%.
  • The Act permanently repeals the corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT).

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A Review Of Significant TCJA Provisions Affecting Small Businesses

William Rogers, Tax Advisor, Tax Blog, Rancho Santa Fe, California, USA, TaxConnections

Now that small businesses and their owners have filed their 2017 income tax returns (or filed for an extension), it’s a good time to review some of the provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) that may significantly impact their taxes for 2018 and beyond. Generally, the changes apply to tax years beginning after December 31, 2017, and are permanent, unless otherwise noted.

Corporate Taxation

  • Replacement of graduated corporate rates ranging from 15% to 35% with a flat corporate rate of 21%
  • Replacement of the flat personal service corporation (PSC) rate of 35% with a flat rate of 21%
  • Repeal of the 20% corporate alternative minimum tax (AMT)

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Newly-Revised Estimated Tax Form And Publication Can Help People Pay The Right Amount

Tom Kerester, Tax Ambassador, Tax Blog, Washington D.C., USA, TaxConnections

WASHINGTON – With tax reform bringing major changes for the year ahead, the Internal Revenue Service today reminded the many self-employed individuals, retirees, investors and others who need to pay their taxes quarterly that the first estimated tax payment for 2018 is due on Tuesday, April 17, 2018.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, enacted in December 2017, changed the way tax is calculated for most taxpayers, including those with substantial income not subject to withholding. Among other things, the new law changed the tax rates and brackets, revised business expense deductions, increased the standard deduction, removed personal exemptions, increased the child tax credit and limited or discontinued certain deductions. As a result, many taxpayers may need to raise or lower the amount of tax they pay each quarter through the estimated tax system. Read more

Inflation Adjustments Under Recently Enacted Tax Law

Tom Kerester, Tax Blog, Tax Ambassador, Washington D.C., USA, TaxConnections

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service has updated the tax year 2018 annual inflation adjustments to reflect changes from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). The tax year 2018 adjustments are generally used on tax returns filed in 2019.

The tax items affected by TCJA for tax year 2018 of greatest interest to most taxpayers include the following dollar amounts: Read more

Many Corporations Will Pay A Blended Federal Income Tax This Year Under The New Tax Reform Law

Tom Kerester, Tax Ambassador, Tax Blog, Washington D.C., USA, TaxConnections

WASHINGTON – Many U.S. corporations elect to use a fiscal year end and not a calendar year end for federal income tax reporting purposes.  Due to a provision in the recently enacted Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), a corporation with a fiscal year that includes Jan. 1, 2018 will pay federal income tax using a blended tax rate and not the flat 21 percent tax rate under the TCJA that would generally apply to taxable years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017.

Corporations determine their federal income tax for fiscal years that include Jan. 1, 2018, by first calculating their tax for the entire taxable year using the tax rates in effect prior to TCJA and then calculating their tax using the new 21 percent rate, subsequently proportioning each tax amount based on the number of days in the taxable year when the different rates were in effect.  Read more

Combat Zone Tax Benefits Now Available To Armed Forces Members Who Served In The Sinai Peninsula

Tom Kerester, Tax Ambassador, Tax Blog, Washington D.C., USA, TaxConnections

WASHINGTON — U.S. Armed Forces members who served in the Sinai Peninsula of Egypt may qualify for combat zone tax benefits retroactive to June 2015, according to the Internal Revenue Service.

Under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) enacted in December 2017, members of the U.S. Army, U.S. Navy, U.S. Marines, U.S. Air Force, and U.S. Coast Guard who performed services in the Sinai Peninsula can now claim combat zone tax benefits. Eligible service members should review Publication 3, Armed Forces’ Tax Guide, available on IRS.gov. Read more

Inflation Adjustments Under Recently Enacted Tax Law

Tom Kerester, Tax Ambassador, Tax Blog, Washington D.C., USA, TaxConnections

WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service has updated the tax year 2018 annual inflation adjustments to reflect changes from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). The tax year 2018 adjustments are generally used on tax returns filed in 2019.

The tax items affected by TCJA for tax year 2018 of greatest interest to most taxpayers include the following dollar amounts:

  • The standard deduction for married filing jointly rises to $24,000. For single taxpayers and married individuals filing separately, the standard deduction rises to $12,000; for heads of households, $18,000.

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How Are Nonprofits Affected By The Tax Cuts And Jobs Act?

Kazim Qasim, Tax Advisor, Tax Blog, Orlando, Florida, USA, TaxConnections

After a lengthy process, Congress and the President did what they had to do in late December 2017 to put into law one of the most significant pieces of legislation in decades: the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA). The Act put into place a number of provisions that will affect Not for Profit Organizations. Note the following areas of tax impact that the provisions of the TCJA  brought in relation to Not For Profit Organizations, as noted in Yeo Yeo:

  • Changes the computation of unrelated business taxable income (UBIT) if an organization has more than one unrelated trade or business. It’s possible that more nonprofits will have to pay UBIT. As Nolo explains:

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The New Tax Code: Consider Savvy Restructuring

Daniel Morris, Tax Advisor, Tax Blog, San Jose, California, USA, TaxConnections

We won’t say we were barraged with questions of concern after the announcement of the most sweeping U.S. tax legislation in more than 30 years, but pretty darn close. At least we’re starting to have “Strategic” conversation about Taxes now instead of it being an afterthought.

The 2017 Tax Cuts Jobs Act And Opportunities

While the new legislation includes many pro-growth features, including a deep reduction in the corporate tax rate, a scaled-back state, and the local tax deduction, full-expensing for five years, and lower individual tax rates, discipline is essential. Read more

Child Credit To Get Even More Valuable & The New Deal On Employee Meals And Entertainment

Michael Davis, Tax Advisor, Tax Blog, Jamison, Pennsylvania, USA, TaxConnections

The child credit has long been a valuable tax break. But, with the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) late last year, it’s now even better — at least for a while. Here are some details that every family should know.

Amount And Limitations

For the 2017 tax year, the child credit may help reduce federal income tax liability dollar-for-dollar by up to $1,000 for each qualifying child under age 17. So if you haven’t yet filed your personal return or you might consider amending it, bear this in mind.
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