TaxConnections


 

Tag Archive for Estate Planning

Estate Planning – Here Is What Can Happen Without An Estate Plan

Haik Chilingaryan - Pass-Through Entities

Let’s begin by debunking an age-old myth that somehow estate planning is only pertinent to those people who have a significant amount of wealth. There are many compelling reasons for anyone to have an estate plan. One such reason is to prevent the courts from making decisions on your behalf, especially in such a manner that you would probably not want to be made in the first place. In addition to overriding your wishes, the court proceedings may come with a heavy price tag and take a very long time before all the dust settles.

In essence, effective estate planning solves matters of life and death. It allows you to decide who will make health care and financial decisions in the event a mental or physical condition renders you disabled or incapacitated. It also allows you to determine who will inherit your assets and when those assets will be inherited. Similarly, estate planning allows you to determine who will inherit your business in the event you are disabled, incapacitated or dead. It also provides you with the tools you need to protect your children and any family members with special needs.

Read more

Estate Planning In A Nutshell

Haik Chilingaryan, Estate Planning Tax Lawyer, Los Angeles, CA

What Is Estate Planning?

An estate plan includes trusts, wills, health care directives, financial directives, guardian designations, and living wills. However, proper estate planning does not merely include the delivery of these documents, but the process of identifying the objectives sought by our clients and putting in place the strategies that help them achieve their goals. Thus, estate planning primarily consists of the advice and guidance that you get from a professional who can be a steward in the preservation of your wealth.

In a nutshell, our firm takes the comprehensive approach to estate planning, which includes not only the methods in which a person’s assets are distributed upon death, but also the implementation of strategies that preserve the most amount of wealth during one’s life. It follows that the most amount of wealth that can be preserved during one’s life can increase the overall value of the estate, which the beneficiaries will receive upon one’s death. Our firm also uses the various tools available in the legal realm in order to protect the assets of our clients from creditors and predators.

Read more

The Down And Dirty On The New Tax Rules And Estate Planning

Most articles about the passage of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act in December buzz about the resulting income tax consequences for individuals and businesses.

But what about the intersection of the TCJA and estate planning?

In a report by Stefi Gascon Hafen, published by AccountingToday, she comes to some interesting conclusions about the TCJA’s significant impact on estate planning. Read more

5 Non-Tax Reasons For Estate Planning

As the Unified Gift and Estate exemption is now $5.49 million per person, is there still a need for a living trust or estate plan?  There are many reasons for a comprehensive estate plan other than to save estate taxes.  Below are just five of these reasons how a good estate plan can be beneficial and help achieve goals.

1) Avoid probate

In California probate is a process where a will must be proven to the court, and it is notoriously costly and lengthy.  In addition to the administrative hassle, probate can also have fees up to 4% of the estate.  However, with a trust plan in place probate, with its fees and headaches, can be avoided. Read more

Significance Of Stepped Up Basis In Estate Planning IRC 1014

According to Internal Revenue Code Section 1014 the basis of property acquired from a decedent is the fair market value of the property at the date of the decedent’s death.

This is often referred to as stepped up basis and it is profoundly significant for U.S. taxpayers dealing with the myriad of issues surrounding estate planning or tax preferential transfer of assets. Read more

Estate Planning For American Expatriates

Retiring abroad is more popular than ever, thanks to perceptions of a better quality of life, more affordable health care, and a warmer climate.

Americans living abroad earning over $10,000 a year (or just $400 of self-employment income) are still required to file a U.S. tax return though, declaring their world wide income. This includes expats who have retired or settled permanently abroad. Read more

Stepped Up Basis In Estate Planning IRC 1014

According to Internal Revenue Code Section 1014 the basis of property acquired from a decedent is the fair market value of the property at the date of the decedent’s death.

This is often referred to as stepped up basis and it is profoundly significant for US taxpayers dealing with the myriad of issues surrounding estate planning or tax preferential transfer of assets. Read more

Good To Know… Part 1 – From Larry Stolberg, CPA, CA

Short Blog Posts In One Location…

◊ U.S. Tax withholding for Canadians
Make sure you have the correct amount withheld from US income received. Generally amounts withheld in excess of treaty rates  will not be creditable in Canada. In order to get the a refund from the IRS, you will need to file a U.S. 1040NR return and apply for an ITIN (individual taxpayer identification number) with the ITIN office.
Waiver forms such as the W8BEN should be submitted  to the payor prior to the anticipated receipt of any US income to ensure the lower treaty rate (which could be 0%, 5%, 10% or 15%) in lieu of the US IRS code withholding rate of 30%. Interest, dividends, royalties, pension are usually the types of income  that are overlooked. Read more

Start 2015 Tax Planning Now! Part 3

Tax Code Changes Create Challenges

Inheritance taxes and estate planning are a growing concern for affluent baby boomers. What are some of the major issues?

In addition to the double step-up in basis on community property discussed above, the baby boom generation will benefit from some of the most generous estate tax loopholes in history. For example, married couples have complete spousal exemption from estate and gift tax when transferring property to each other. This has not always been the case.

For 2015, every person has a lifetime net gift and estate tax exemption up to $5.43 million. Considering that the top gift and estate tax rate is 40%, this exemption represents an Read more

IRC 1014 And The Significance of Stepped Up Basis In Estate Planning

According to Internal Revenue Code Section 1014 the basis of property acquired from a decedent is the fair market value of the property at the date of the decedent’s death. This is often referred to as stepped up basis and it is profoundly significant for US taxpayers dealing with the myriad of issues surrounding estate planning or tax preferential transfer of assets.

For those of you not used to the term ‘basis’ it generally is defined as the cost or value of an investment, asset or something that is owned, given or inherited at the time it was acquired. It also refers to any investment in improvements made to the asset while you owned it. Read more

Non-Statutory Asset Protection Trusts

Introduction

In the United States, there has been a malpractice crisis for the medical profession for a number of years. It has at its roots the American Trial Lawyers who advocate a position that the medical profession is not adequately regulated for physicians whose practice causes harm to their clients. Its associations vigorously contend that victims of malpractice by physicians are inadequately compensated from injury and demand that no limits can be imposed as to the amounts mandated by the jury. The insurance underwriters of medical professionals assert that large verdicts have caused them to raise premiums where they depart from economic reality. When a physician factors in the cost of insurance in terms of doing business, the risk-reward analysis in specific Read more

Estate Planning Part 3 – Old Age

TaxConnections Blog Picture After a lifetime of working, retirement sounds like it would be fun.  When you get to retirement there are lots of changes in your life and one of them should be your estate planning.  At this point your kids are grown and maybe you have grandchildren.  Reworking your will and trusts to include grandchildren and account for other changes in the family can be important.

Gifting can play a major role in your estate planning.  In Minnesota, the estate and gift exemptions are only $1M so annual gifts can be useful in keeping an estate under the $1M threshold.  A couple of kids plus spouses, plus a few grandchildren can make for a big gifting base.  In 2013 you can gift $14,000 to each person without filing a gift tax return.  If you are so inclined, you could gift $14,000 to each person and quickly reduce the assets in your estate.

Another way to change your estate planning is to change the beneficiary designations on your retirement plan accounts.  IRAs and 401ks can be a great way to skip generations in your estate planning.  When a non-spousal beneficiary receives an IRA or 401k from an estate, they are required to make minimum distributions each year.  Those minimum distributions are based on the age of the beneficiary.  A 55 year-old child that inherits an IRA will need to withdraw 3.4% each year, while a 25 year-old grandchild only has to withdraw 1.7% each year.  That can make a huge difference over time as the account grows tax free.  Each family situation is different and the needs of the family and each beneficiary can vary, but it’s important to update your estate planning at each stage of your life.

Meet Tax Experts At TaxConnections...