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IRS Finalizes Regulations For 100 Percent Bonus Depreciation

IRS Finalizes Regulations For 100 Percent Bonus Depreciation

The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service today released the last set of final regulations PDF implementing the 100% additional first year depreciation deduction that allows businesses to write off the cost of most depreciable business assets in the year they are placed in service by the business.

The 100% additional first year depreciation deduction was created in 2017 by the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and generally applies to depreciable business assets with a recovery period of 20 years or less and certain other property. Machinery, equipment, computers, appliances and furniture generally qualify.

The deduction applies to qualifying property (including used property) acquired and placed in service after September 27, 2017. The final regulations provide clarifying guidance on the requirements that must be met for property to qualify for the deduction, including used property.

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IRS To Mail Special Letter To Estimated 9 Million Non-Filers, Urging Them To Claim Economic Impact Payment By Oct. 15

IRS To Mail Special Letter To Estimated 9 Million Non-Filers, Urging Them To Claim Economic Impact Payment By Oct. 15

Later this month, the Internal Revenue Service will start mailing letters to roughly 9 million Americans who typically don’t file federal income tax returns who may be eligible for, but have not registered to claim, an Economic Impact Payment. 

The letters will urge recipients to register at IRS.gov by Oct. 15 in order to receive their payment by the end of the year. Individuals can receive up to $1,200, and married couples can receive up to $2,400. People with qualifying children under age 17 at the end of 2019 can get up to an additional $500 for each qualifying child.

The letters are being sent to people who haven’t filed a return for either 2018 or 2019. Based on an internal analysis, these are people who don’t typically have a tax return filing requirement because they appear to have very low incomes, based on Forms W-2, 1099s and other third-party statements available to the IRS. But many in this group are still eligible to receive an Economic Impact Payment.

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Know The IRS Collection Statue Expiration Date

Keith Jones:The IRS Collection Statue Expiration Date

IRS Collection Statue Expiration Date (CSED)
“It is a basic concept of law that once a statute of limitation has passed, no action barred by the statute may take place.”

–Procedurally Taxing

The IRS collections statute expiration date (CSED) is the date after which the IRS can no longer collect a tax debt.

When things are simple, the CSED is easily calculated as 10 years from the date of assessment.

This means that no matter how little the IRS has been able to collect on a tax debt assessed in April of 2007, they must cease collection on that debt in April of 2017.

However, when you’re working with the IRS, things are rarely as simple as you’d like. There are a handful of events that can result in extending the CSED date (sometimes called “tolling events”).
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IRS Reminds Businesses Filing Cash Transactions

IRS Reminds Businesses Filing Cash Transactions

IRS reminds businesses filing cash transaction reports about e-file option; batch filing now available

The Internal Revenue Service reminds businesses required to file reports of large cash transactions that e-filing is a fast, easy and secure option for filing their reports. Now, businesses can batch file their reports, which is especially helpful to those required to file many forms.

Although businesses have the option of filing Form 8300, Report of Cash Payments Over $10,000, on paper, many have already found the free and secure e-filing system is a more convenient and cost-effective way to meet the reporting deadline. The form is due 15 days after a transaction and there’s no charge for the e-file option.

Although many cash transactions are legitimate, information reported on this form can help stop those who evade taxes, profit from the drug trade, engage in terrorist financing and conduct other criminal activities. The government can often trace money from these illegal activities through the payments reported on Form 8300 and other cash reporting forms.
Businesses that file Form 8300 electronically get free, automatic acknowledgment of receipt when they file. In addition, electronic filing is more accurate, reducing the need for follow-up correspondence with the IRS.
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Treasury, IRS Issue Final And Proposed Regulations On Income Subject To A High Rate Of Foreign Tax

Treasury, IRS issue final and proposed regulations on income subject to a high rate of foreign tax

The Department of the Treasury and the Internal Revenue Service today issued a final regulation addressing the treatment of income earned by certain foreign corporations that is subject to a high rate of foreign tax.

The final regulations allow taxpayers to exclude certain high-taxed income of a controlled foreign corporation from their Global Intangible Low Taxed Income (GILTI) computation on an elective basis.

Treasury and the IRS today also issued a proposed regulation regarding the high-tax exception with the GILTI high-tax exclusion. Treasury and the IRS welcome public comments.

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IRS On Elimination Of Deduction Of Qualified Transportation Fringe Benefit Expenses

IRS On Elimination Of Deduction Of Qualified Transportation Fringe Benefit Expenses

The Internal Revenue Service issued proposed regulations that provide guidance for the deduction of qualified transportation fringe and commuting expenses.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) does not allow deductions for qualified transportation fringe (QTF) expenses and does not allow deductions for certain expenses of transportation and commuting between an employee’s residence and place of employment.

The law also provided that a tax-exempt organization’s unrelated business taxable income is increased by the amount of the QTF expense that is nondeductible. However, on December 20, 2019, this was repealed as part of the Further Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2020. This repeal was retroactive to the original date of enactment by the TCJA.
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IRS Outlines Changes To Health Care Spending Available Under CARES Act

IRS: TaxConnections: Care Act

The Internal Revenue Service has advised that new rules under the CARES Act provide flexibility for health care spending that may be helpful in the current environment where more people may need at-home services due to measures to fight the coronavirus.

Telehealth And High Deductible Health Plans

Under the CARES Act, a high deductible health plan (HDHP) temporarily can cover telehealth and other remote care services without a deductible, or with a deductible below the minimum annual deductible otherwise required by law. Telehealth and other remote care services also are temporarily included as categories of coverage that are disregarded for the purpose of determining whether an individual who has other health plan coverage in addition to an HDHP is an eligible individual who may make tax-favored contributions to his or her HSA. Thus, an otherwise eligible individual with coverage under an HDHP may still contribute to an HSA despite receiving coverage for telehealth and other remote care services before satisfying the HDHP deductible, or despite receiving coverage for these services outside the HDHP. The temporary rules under the CARES Act, as extended by IRS Notice 2020-29, apply to services provided on or after Jan. 1, 2020, with respect to plan years beginning on or before Dec. 31, 2021.

Expansion Of Qualified Medical Expenses

The CARES Act also modifies the rules that apply to various tax-advantaged accounts (HSAs, Archer MSAs, Health FSAs, and HRAs) so that additional items are “qualified medical expenses” that may be reimbursed from those accounts. Specifically, the cost of menstrual care products is now reimbursable. These products are defined as tampons, pads, liners, cups, sponges or other similar products. In addition, over-the-counter products and medications are now reimbursable without a prescription. The new rules apply to amounts paid after Dec. 31, 2019. Taxpayers should save receipts of their purchases for their records and so that they are able to submit claims for reimbursements.
More information

The IRS will provide any further updates as soon as they are available on its webpage at IRS.gov/coronavirus

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IRS’ People First Initiative Provides Compliance Relief

IRS’ People First Initiative Provides Compliance Relief

The Internal Revenue Service unveiled the People First Initiative on March 25, 2020. It is an unprecedented effort to temporarily scale back many collection and enforcement activities by the IRS during the COVID-19 global pandemic.

The purpose of the People First Initiative is to immediately ease the burden on people facing tax issues as much as possible, to enable them to better focus on the well-being of themselves and others during this unprecedented situation for the nation. It is not permanent, but it will stay in effect until it is deemed to no longer be needed.

In consultation with its partners, the IRS will continue to review the People First Initiative and modify or expand it as needed during this situation.

Main Elements of People First Initiative
The initiative modifies numerous IRS compliance programs, providing taxpayer relief for the following programs:
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Treasury, IRS Provide Safe Harbor For Taxpayers That Develop Renewable Energy Projects

The Treasury Department and the Internal Revenue Service is providing relief for taxpayers developing renewable energy projects and producing electricity from sources such as wind, biomass, geothermal, landfill gas, trash, and hydropower. Safe harbor is also available for taxpayers using technologies such as solar panels, fuel cells, microturbines, and combined heat and power systems.

The IRS recognizes that COVID-19 has caused industry-wide delays in the supply chain for components needed to complete renewable energy projects otherwise eligible for important tax credits. The IRS has issued Notice 2020-41 to provide tax relief to affected taxpayers.

For certain projects that began construction in 2016 or 2017, Notice 2020-41 adds an extra year to the four year “Continuity Safe Harbor” provided in existing guidance. If these projects are placed in service in five years construction will be deemed continuous.

Notice 2020-41 also provides assurance for taxpayers who started construction by incurring 5 percent of project costs, and made payments for services or property and reasonably expected to receive such services or property within 3 ½ months. These taxpayers are considered incurred under economic performance rules. The Notice provides that if such services or property are received by October 15, 2020, the taxpayer’s expectations at the time of the 2019 payment are deemed reasonable.
Extending the Continuity Safe Harbor and providing a 3½ Month Safe Harbor will provide flexibility for taxpayers to satisfy the beginning of construction requirements and limit the impact of COVID-19-related delays on the ability to claim tax credits.

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IRS People First Initiative Limits Certain Enforcement Actions

IRS People First Initiative Limits Certain Enforcement Actions

The IRS postponed certain compliance actions under a new program entitled “IRS People First Initiative,” effective April 1, and running through July 15 initially, in an effort to help taxpayers facing tax challenges in light of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The changes include issues ranging from postponing certain payments related to Installment Agreements and Offers in Compromise to collection procedures and limiting certain enforcement actions.

The new IRS People First Initiative outlines the IRS’s temporary policies in the following key tax areas:

-Earned Income Tax Credit and Wage Verification Reviews
-Non-Filers
-Audits
-Appeals
-Field Collection Actions
-Liens and Levies
-Passport Certifications to the State Department
-Private Debt Collection
-Statute of Limitations
-Practitioner Priority Service
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IRS Provides Tax Relief Through Increased Flexibility For Taxpayers In Section 125 Cafeteria Plans

IRS Provides Tax Relief Through Increased Flexibility For Taxpayers In Section 125 Cafeteria Plans

The Internal Revenue Service today released guidance to allow temporary changes to section 125 cafeteria plans. These changes extend the claims period for health flexible spending arrangements (FSAs) and dependent care assistance programs and allow taxpayers to make mid-year changes.

The guidance issued today addresses unanticipated changes in expenses because of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and provides that previously provided temporary relief for high deductible health plans may be applied retroactively to January 1, 2020, and it also increases for inflation the $500 permitted carryover amount for health FSAs to $550.

Notice 2020-29 (PDF) provides greater flexibility for taxpayers by:

-extending claims periods for taxpayers to apply unused amounts remaining in a health FSA or dependent care assistance program for expenses incurred for those same qualified benefits through December 31, 2020.
-expanding the ability of taxpayers to make mid-year elections for health coverage, health FSAs, and dependent care assistance programs, allowing them to respond to changes in needs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
-applying earlier relief for high deductible health plans to cover expenses related to COVID-19, and a temporary exemption for telehealth services retroactively to January 1, 2020.
Notice 2020-33 (PDF) responds to Executive Order 13877, which directs the Secretary of the Treasury to “issue guidance to increase the amount of funds that can carry over without penalty at the end of the year for flexible spending arrangements.” The notice increases the limit for unused health FSA carryover amounts from $500, to a maximum of $550, as adjusted annually for inflation.

IRS