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Tag Archive for C Corporation

Should A Loan-Out Be A “C” Corporation Or An “S” Corporation?

Mitchell Miller
Although many people in the entertainment industry have formed or converted their loan-outs to S corporations, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (TCJA) changed some of the tax rules that affect these corporations (and their owners!).

Let’s see how these changes affect the choice of what entity to use when forming a loan-out corporation:

● Using an S corporation (S corp) loan-out may cost you most of your deductions.

S corps are required (and have been for many years) to pass out employee business expenses to their shareholders, and not to deduct such expenses at the corporate level. That means that expenses such as the fees for agents, managers, lawyers, and business managers are not deductible by the corporation. Instead these fees are supposed to be only deductible by you, the shareholder, on your individual return, as miscellaneous itemized deductions on your Schedule A. But, under the TCJA changes, miscellaneous itemized deductions are no longer deductible (at all!). In other words, you will now be taxed on all your income and get none of your deductions.

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A Brief Overview On How Tax Reform Affects Choice Of Entity

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), signed by President Trump in Dec. 2017, has significant implications for how businesses will assess the choice of entity. Prior to reform, partnerships were a very common choice of entity, but with the new provisions in TCJA, the C corporation has become an appealing option once again (but with some caveats).

The assessment by the National Law Review provides details on these significant developments in choice of entity. In general it makes a helpful point: the entity choice will continue to involve a number of considerations, such as the makeup of the investor base, capitalization structure, borrowing requirements, likelihood of distributing earnings, state tax environment, compensation and benefit considerations, participation of owners in the business, presence of foreign operations, and sale or exit strategies.

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What Entities Qualify For The New Section 199A Business Write-off?

In 2018, a new tax write-off has been created for qualifying businesses – the Section 199A Business Deduction.

This deduction equates to 20% of Qualified Business Income assuming you meet income and salary limitations.  Also, shareholder reasonable compensation, interest, dividends and capital gains and losses don’t qualify. But if you meet these requirements, exactly what entities and businesses have Qualified Business Income?  Based on my research, here are the qualifying businesses:

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S Corporations vs. C Corporations In 2018

Many of you are wondering how the new tax rate changes will impact you. Obviously, we can’t answer that off the top of our heads as each person’s situation is different, and in many cases, experts are still trying to figure out how the changes will play out. One of the biggest changes is the corporate tax rate reduction to a maximum of 21% versus the maximum tax rate for individuals being around 37%.

The new tax legislation becomes effective January 1. That means many business owners are now considering whether to reorganize themselves as C corps.

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Tax Reform Creates Desire For The C Corporation

When you first see a 21 percent tax rate for the C corporation, you have to think this could be the choice of entity for your business operation. Further, when you find yourself in the out-of-favor group for the 20 percent deduction authorized by new tax code Section 199A, you naturally gravitate to thinking about the C corporation, perhaps as a means of getting even.

The table below gives you a good look at how you would pay taxes on your profits, depending on your Form 1040 tax bracket. In the S corporation column, we listed the tax rates by the brackets that apply to individuals. To see exactly how this table works, let’s say that you are in the 34 percent tax bracket and have $100,000 in profits.

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S Corporation Vs. C Corporation In 2018

Many of you are wondering how the new tax rate changes will impact you. Obviously we can’t answer that off the top of our heads as each person’s situation is different, and in many cases experts are still trying to figure out how the changes will play out. One of the biggest changes is the corporate tax rate reduction to a maximum of 21% versus the maximum tax rate for individuals being around 37%. Read more

Choosing Between A ‘C’ OR ‘S’ Corporation – Selling Options For your Business

Ron Oddo

Usually, no other factors carry the weight of the tax issue or significantly differentiate the C from the S Corporation. Limited liability is attainable in both the C and S Corporation forms. Voting rights need not differ. An S Corporation conducts business, on a day-to-day basis, exactly as a regular corporation. The only difference between the C and S Corporation is the filing of a one-page IRS form (Form 2553) electing treatment as an S Corporation.

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Choosing Between A ‘C’ OR ‘S’ Corporation – Weighing Tax Attributes

Ron Oddo

Question most CPAs as to what business form they suggest for the business clients and they typically answer, “A C Corporation—at least in the early capital formation years of the business.” Ask any Investment Banker or other Transaction Advisor what entity they prefer and you will likely hear, “An S Corporation or LLC (Limited Liability Company), or perhaps a partnership or sole proprietorship. Anything, anything, but a C Corporation!”

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Charitable Contribution Incentives In PATH Act

John Stancil

The Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act (PATH) contains a number of tax provisions that are designed to reduce the amount of taxes paid by United States taxpayers. This act was signed by the President in December 2015. The provisions in the act are not new incentives, but made existing incentives permanent. This can be seen as somewhat significant as there is sentiment in Congress and elsewhere to reduce the tax benefit from charitable contributions. I would add that “permanent” in tax lingo means the provisions do not expire, but may be changed at any time by Congress.

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Tax-Free Sales Of Corporate Stock

One day, you had an idea for a business. Acting on your dreams, you formed a corporation and opened a business. As it turned out, your business was highly successful but now you would like to step back, sell your stock, and enjoy the fruits of your labors. But you hesitate because you really don’t want to pay such a huge tax bill.

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CRA Forms Overlooked By Canadians Investing In U.S. Real Estate

Larry Stolberg

The T1134 and T1135 are a sample of Canadian foreign information returns such as the U.S. 8938, 5471, or 8865.

A number of Canadians are investing in the U.S. real estate market with a U.S. limited partnership, whose limited partners are solely Canadian residents and the general partner is a U.S. C corporation, whose shareholders are also Canadian residents.

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