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Tag Archive for John Richardson

Testimony: Businessman Abroad Affected By FATCA

John Richardson, Tax Advisor

To Whom It May Concern:

Thank you for the opportunity to comment to the Committee. Under normal circumstances I would introduce myself however, given present circumstances, I cannot as my status as a US Person, is being reviewed by the State Department at my request to validate my relinquishing acts in the early 1970’s.

I am a Canadian citizen, registered as a Canadian born abroad at birth, in the United States while my Canadian parents completed their post graduate education in the United States.

If you are unaware, with the exception of the United States, it is not a good thing to be considered a US Person (a newly coined status) for tax purposes, if you live outside the U.S. It is not a good thing to have any U.S. indicia at all. Who am I?

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Testimony: A Letter To Senators From An American Affected By FATCA

John Richardson, Tax Advisor

Dear Senators:

I wish to address a serious injustice that the United States government is perpetrating against millions of innocent law-abiding citizens and residents of countries around the world. Through the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (“FATCA”), the United States of America is violating the international human rights of persons who possess some degree of (often distant) US origin.

All of you and I share one thing in common: we were born in the USA. However, I was born to a Canadian father, who brought my family back to Canada when I was an infant. I am therefore a Canadian citizen from birth (“born abroad”) and I have lived essentially my entire life in Canada, only as a Canadian. I have never lived as an adult, studied, worked or earned income in the US.

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Testimony: The Effects Of The Current Tax System On Americans Abroad

John Richardson, Tax Advisor

Good morning and thank you for the opportunity to speak with you today. My name is Marilyn Ginsburg. I will be 70 years old next month and I renounced my U.S. citizenship, with great regret, in my 69th year.

I was born in St. Louis, grew up in Denver, and moved to Canada when I was 26 years old. My husband and I left the United States in June, 1971, a month after we had both finished graduate school, I with a law degree and my husband with a PhD. in American history.We both obtained jobs teaching in our fields at a Canadian University. We assumed we would stay in Canada for a few interesting years, living in another country, and then return to hearth and home. One thing led to another and this never happened, and we have now lived in Canada for 44 years.

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Imposing Taxation On Tax Residents Of Other Countries

John Richardson

(This is Part 2 of my post discussing the South Africa tax situation. Part 1 is here.)

This is a follow up to my post exploring whether South Africa is moving to a tax system that is based on “citizenship-based taxation” or (in the case of the United States of America) “taxation-based citizenship”. That post was the result of a “special request”. The response from that first post included: Read more

Part 1: South Africa And The USA—Citizenship-Based Taxation

There have been a number of suggestions in various blogs that South Africa is somehow taxing on the basis of citizenship. American citizens (whether by accident or design) are most sensitive to any discussion of “citizenship-based taxation”. After all, U.S. tax policies combined with FATCA (which is part of the Internal Revenue Code) are destroying the lives of those who have entered the U.S. tax system.

I recently received an email that asked:

They’re talking about SA expats, people who no longer live in SA, being taxed by SA. Like us, these people are residents and earners in countries other than their country of origin (and, I would assume, citizenship). http://www.internationalinvestment.net/regions/south-african-expats-hit-tax-exemption-removal-plans/ If this is not CBT, on what basis are they being taxed? If SA is just wanting to expand its definition of tax residency on what basis do they feel they can apply this to someone who no longer lives in their country? Read more

Green Card, Leaving The US And Escaping Taxation

Well he won the lottery. Specifically he won the “Green Card” lottery. He and his wife came all the way from an Asian country to “Live The Dream” – specifically the dream of living in the United States of America.

He spoke English. His wife did not speak English. He believed in strict compliance in the law. His wife relied on him to ensure her compliance with the law. Read more

Stop Imposing Taxation On Residents Of Other Countries

Some of you may be interested in the “short letter” that I sent by regular mail to the “powers to be” in Washington who are working on “Tax Reform”.

A “Town Hall” interview with Speaker Ryan suggests that Tax Reform is going to happen. The question is whether individuals will also be considered. In January of 2017 Republicans Overseas proposed “territorial taxation” for individuals. This week the Republican National Committee adopted a resolution from Republicans Overseas urging that “territorial taxation” for individuals be adopted. Read more

What Does The New U.S. Treasury Model Tax Treaty Mean For You?

John Richardson

On July 12, the U.S. Treasury released its 2016 Model Tax Treaty. I suspect that people will interpret this in terms of how it affects their individual tax situations. This gives a huge clue with respect to information exchange and how the U.S. views “double taxation,” citizenship-based taxation, and related issues.

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Reporting A “Treaty-Based Position”—Internal Revenue Code S. 6114 Using Form 8833

John Richardson

The United States has many tax treaties with many nations. As a general principle the “savings clause” prevents Americans abroad from having the benefit of treaty provisions. That said, there are situations where a U.S. citizen abroad can benefit from the specific provisions of a specific treaty.

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Part 13 – Understanding “Exit Taxes”

“I relinquished U.S. citizenship many years ago. Could I still have U.S. tax citizenship?”

Attn: Former U.S. Citizens: Are you STILL or have you EVER BEEN a U.S. “Tax Citizen”?

Synopsis:

This is a long post. In fact, it is too long for the average reader. Therefore, I wish to summarize the purpose and possible (but not certain conclusion) of the post in a few simple sentences.

Here goes:

If you were born in the United States (and became a U.S. citizen at birth) who moved to Canada and naturalized as a Canadian Citizen prior to June 3, 2004:

1. Without informing the U.S. State Department or applying for a Certificate of Loss of Nationality; and Read more

Part 12 – Understanding “Exit Taxes”

“The two kinds of U.S. citizenship: Citizenship for “immigration and nationality” and citizenship for “taxation” – Are we taxed because we are citizens or are we citizens because we are taxed?”

The United States of America – One country two citizenships – Introducing the “Tax Citizen”.  Dual Citizenship – American style – All Americans are both “Citizens” and “Tax Citizens”. One Country – Two Citizenships.

First Citizenship – Citizenship for Nationality Purposes

Americans have always been proud of their U.S. citizenship. Most U.S. citizens regard their U.S. citizenship as the most valuable thing they have. Most Americans will fight for their citizenship. They will die for their citizenship. They Read more

Cook v. Tait 1924 – The Evolution of Citizenship, Taxation And “Citizenship Taxation” – Part 2

Part 1 of this post traced the evolution of taxation.  This brings us to:

Part 2 – The Evolution of Citizenship

In 1924, the Supreme Court of the United States, per Justice McKenna ruled in Cook v. Tait that U.S. “citizenship taxation” was constitutional. Since that time Cook v. Tait has been cited to justify the constitutionality, although not necessarily the propriety, of “citizenship taxation”. Note that “citizenship taxation” contains both the words “citizenship” and “taxation”. As a result, Justice McKenna’s decision along with the relevant statutes, may tell us a great deal about what “taxation” and “citizenship” meant in 1924.

Cook v. Tait – Justice McKenna’s decision Read more

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