Tag Archive for John Richardson

What Does The New U.S. Treasury Model Tax Treaty Mean For You?

John Richardson

On July 12, the U.S. Treasury released its 2016 Model Tax Treaty. I suspect that people will interpret this in terms of how it affects their individual tax situations. This gives a huge clue with respect to information exchange and how the U.S. views “double taxation,” citizenship-based taxation, and related issues.

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Reporting A “Treaty-Based Position”—Internal Revenue Code S. 6114 Using Form 8833

John Richardson

The United States has many tax treaties with many nations. As a general principle the “savings clause” prevents Americans abroad from having the benefit of treaty provisions. That said, there are situations where a U.S. citizen abroad can benefit from the specific provisions of a specific treaty.

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Part 13 – Understanding “Exit Taxes”

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“I relinquished U.S. citizenship many years ago. Could I still have U.S. tax citizenship?”

Attn: Former U.S. Citizens: Are you STILL or have you EVER BEEN a U.S. “Tax Citizen”?


This is a long post. In fact, it is too long for the average reader. Therefore, I wish to summarize the purpose and possible (but not certain conclusion) of the post in a few simple sentences.

Here goes:

If you were born in the United States (and became a U.S. citizen at birth) who moved to Canada and naturalized as a Canadian Citizen prior to June 3, 2004:

1. Without informing the U.S. State Department or applying for a Certificate of Loss of Nationality; and Read more

Part 12 – Understanding “Exit Taxes”

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“The two kinds of U.S. citizenship: Citizenship for “immigration and nationality” and citizenship for “taxation” – Are we taxed because we are citizens or are we citizens because we are taxed?”

The United States of America – One country two citizenships – Introducing the “Tax Citizen”.  Dual Citizenship – American style – All Americans are both “Citizens” and “Tax Citizens”. One Country – Two Citizenships.

First Citizenship – Citizenship for Nationality Purposes

Americans have always been proud of their U.S. citizenship. Most U.S. citizens regard their U.S. citizenship as the most valuable thing they have. Most Americans will fight for their citizenship. They will die for their citizenship. They Read more

Cook v. Tait 1924 – The Evolution of Citizenship, Taxation And “Citizenship Taxation” – Part 2

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Part 1 of this post traced the evolution of taxation.  This brings us to:

Part 2 – The Evolution of Citizenship

In 1924, the Supreme Court of the United States, per Justice McKenna ruled in Cook v. Tait that U.S. “citizenship taxation” was constitutional. Since that time Cook v. Tait has been cited to justify the constitutionality, although not necessarily the propriety, of “citizenship taxation”. Note that “citizenship taxation” contains both the words “citizenship” and “taxation”. As a result, Justice McKenna’s decision along with the relevant statutes, may tell us a great deal about what “taxation” and “citizenship” meant in 1924.

Cook v. Tait – Justice McKenna’s decision Read more

Cook v. Tait 1924 – The Evolution of Citizenship, Taxation And “Citizenship Taxation” – Part 1

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As goes taxation, so goes society

As Charles Adams argued in his classic book, “For Good and Evil: The Impact of Taxes On The Course Of Civilization“, as go the taxing practices of a nation, so goes the nation. Given that taxes are a certainty, tax laws are a certainty, and those laws speak volumes about the “state of the nation” and the “values of the nation”. Tax laws evolve on an almost daily basis. The changes in tax laws reflect changes in societal values.

In 1924, the Supreme Court of the United States, per Justice McKenna ruled in Cook v. Tait that U.S. “citizenship taxation” was constitutional. Since that time Cook v. Tait has been cited to justify the constitutionality, although not necessarily the propriety, of “citizenship Read more

Part 2: Why Justice Martineau’s Decision Has Handed @ADCSovereignty The Framework For Ultimate Victory – The Importance of “Staying The Course”

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Introduction – what this post is about …

I attended the hearing in Vancouver, B.C. on August 4, 5 2015. At that time I wrote a group of posts (here and here) discussing my perception of the hearing. Those posts included expressions of my opinion that Justice Martineau was highly engaged, was working hard on understanding the issues, and was affording all parties a fair hearing. Although, disappointed with his decision (handed down on September 16, 2015), and not agreeing with his conclusions, I reaffirm my sentiments in the previous posts.

This post is more about the “system” than it is about Justice Martineau specifically. In a judicial system, it is possible for “reasonable people” to have “reasonable Read more

Part 1: Justice Martineau Provides @ADCSovereignty The Only Thing Worse Than A Root Canal

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This post is Part 1 of my thoughts on Justice Martineau’s decision.

I  left my root canal appointment this afternoon to a message announcing that Justice Martineau had rendered his decision. We did not win round 1. Notice that I did NOT say that the Government won round 1.

Here is the decision:

T-1736-14 decision sept-16-2015

Before, I comment specifically on the decision, I want to be clear on the following points: Read more

How To Live Outside The United States In An FBAR And FATCA World

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When in Rome, live as a Homelander” does, when elsewhere, live as they live elsewhere.

Americans abroad are constantly told that they should “come clean”. They should file their U.S. taxes. This assumes that they are somehow “unclean” or perhaps “dirty”. The life of an “American abroad” is about three things:

1. “Thinking Clean” – The importance of “thinking clean” while living abroad. Read more

Impossible And Expensive To Be A US Tax Compliant Citizen Abroad

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Exit Tax Operates To Confiscate Assets Of Those Who Moved From The U.S. Years Ago; And On Assets Acquired After Leaving The U.S. (Including Non-U.S. Pensions)


Introducing Tax Expert and TaxConnections Internet Tax Summit Presenter: John Richardson, Citizenship Solutions, Toronto, Canada

Are you a “Covered Expatriate”?  Learn about this term and so much more regarding FATCA, FBAR and Exit Taxes from John Richardson on September 21st.  See his short introductory video below and get your free VIP Ticket to the Internet Tax Summit. Read more

Renouncing US Citizenship? How The S. 877A “Exit Tax” May Apply To Your Canadian Assets – Introduction

John Richardson And FATCA

There is much discussion of the U.S. rules which operate to impose taxation on the residents of other countries and income earned in those other countries. You will hear references to “citizenship taxation”, “FATCA Canada“, PFIC, etc. It is becoming more common for people to wish to relinquish their U.S. citizenship. The most common form of “relinquishment is renunciation”. The U.S. tax rules, found in the Internal Revenue Code, impose taxes on everything. There is even a tax on “renouncing U.S. citizenship”. I don’t mean the $2350 USD administrative fee which everybody has to pay. (Isn’t that really a tax?). I mean a tax on your assets. To be clear:

• You must pay a price to NOT be a U.S. citizen. Read more

The Problem of #Americansabroad And Ownership of Non-U.S. Real Estate

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Prologue:  Tweet by Citizenship Lawyer – @expatriationLaw – Video:  Carrick Talks Money: The tax issues facing Americans who sell Canadian homes – No tax free capital gain

If (U.S. Person) then (Mr. #FBAR Ms. #PFIC and Uncle #FATCA) = Few investment and financial planning opportunities).

Yes, it’s true. There are only three things that Americans abroad can “invest in” that do not Read more