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Tag Archive for 1099-MISC

How To Deal With 1099-MISC Problems

One of the great things about being self-employed is that no income tax is withheld from your compensation. But you still have to pay taxes on that income and sometimes, your 1099 tax forms will have mistakes. Here’s how to deal with 1099-Misc problems.

Why is a 1099-MISC is Necessary?

The IRS will often still have some idea of how much money you’ve made. Your clients must complete IRS Form 1099 if they’ve paid you more than $600 over the course of the year. Read more

Mistakes Religious Organizations Make When Filing a Tax Return

John Stancil

When it comes to the IRS and religious organizations, these organizations fall into two categories – churches and other religious organizations. Due to the First Amendment, the IRS is extremely reluctant to tread in the area of church organizations. This is not to say that churches have carte blanche to ignore the tax laws, but that the IRS grants them a great deal of leeway in regulating them. All religious organizations are subject to the law in regard to taxation. However, many operate as if the laws do not apply to them. Some of the most common mistakes made by religious organizations are the subject of this article.

At the outset, it should be noted that churches do not have to apply for 501(c)(3) status. They may choose to do so, and there are some very good reasons that they might wish to make such an application. All other religious organizations must apply for this status by completing and filing Form 1023 or Form 1023EZ. A church is automatically treated as though it has 501(c)(3) status.

Filing a return. Churches do not have to file a Form 990. However, some churches file these returns. This is unnecessary and may cause the IRS to take a closer look at the organization. If you don’t have to file, don’t file. Read more

Tax Return Tips For Your 2015 Tax Returns

John Stancil

As The United States Tax Code gets more complex, one would think that the number of individuals utilizing a paid preparer would be on the increase. However, that is not the case. More and more individuals are filing their own returns. I see at least two reasons for this. The individual tax return market can be viewed as consisting of two segments – very simple returns with no itemized deductions or other complications in the return and more complex returns utilizing multiple tax schedules and tax forms. As the standard deduction increases, more taxpayers are taking the standard deduction, so their tax return is fairly simple to prepare. Adding to the simplicity of the return is the second factor – availability of inexpensive or free preparation software. Since these typically guide the taxpayer in preparation, the task becomes even simpler.

However, taxpayers of all stripes should be aware of certain factors involved in filing their returns. I have provided my “Ten Best Tips for Filing your Return.” These tips can be useful for those preparing their own returns, but they can also guide the taxpayer using a CPA or other professional preparer in assembling their information for the preparer.

• File tax returns on time, even if you cannot pay now. You will be assessed a penalty and interest for failure to pay, but you will avoid the failure to file penalty. This penalty is 5% per month of the amount of taxes owed, up to 25%. If you don’t owe, there shouldn’t be a penalty. Read more

Payments To Independent Contractors

Payments to Independent Contractors can be a very grey area within the tax law. Often times I am asked the question, “Should my employees be given a W-2 or Form 1099-MISC for there pay?” There’s really no clear-cut answer to this question. It’s important to answer other questions to even begin to get some clear direction on the proper way to classify a worker as an employee or an independent contractor.

There are two types of business relationships which may exist between an employer/owner and a employee/worker. They are 1. Independent contractor and 2. Employee (common-law employee).

These business relationships are established based on common-law rules: Read more

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