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Tag Archive for tax return

Casualty And Theft Losses

Nanda Kumar, Sterling, Virginia, Tax Blog, Tax Advisor, TaxConnections

It is not unknown for people to suffer a loss in the form of theft and casualty for their personal properties. If you are one of them, you can claim the same as itemized deduction for your tax returns. To do so, you need to fill up the Form 4684 to understand how much of yours loses you can report and then mention the same in the Schedule A of the Form 1040.

It is important to note that you can claim only for those losses that are not covered or reimbursed by any insurance company. Also, in order to qualify for the deductions, your loss should amount to more than 10% of your adjusted gross income. You cannot claim a deduction otherwise. Read more

The Tax Cuts Jobs Act Temporarily Expands Bonus Depreciation

Yelena Sandler, Tax Advisor, Rockyville, ML, TaxConnections

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) enhances some tax breaks for businesses while reducing or eliminating others. One break it enhances — temporarily — is bonus depreciation. While most TCJA provisions go into effect for the 2018 tax year, you might be able to benefit from the bonus depreciation enhancements when you file your 2017 tax return. Pre-TCJA bonus depreciation Under pre-TCJA law, for qualified new assets that your business placed in service in 2017, you can claim a 50% first-year bonus depreciation deduction. Used assets don’t qualify. This tax break is available for the cost of new computer systems, purchased software, vehicles, machinery, equipment, office furniture, etc. Read more

IRS Bills, Penalties And Interest Charges

Generally, April 15th is the deadline for most people to file their individual income tax returns and pay any tax due. During its initial processing, the IRS checks for mathematical accuracy on your tax return. When processing is complete, if you owe any tax, penalties or interest, you’ll receive a bill which you’re responsible for paying. Interest and penalties can add up quickly if you don’t pay the full amount right away. Read more

The 6 Most Basic Rules Of Tax Preparation

Dealing with kids and marriages

If you’re married or divorced be sure that you and your spouse’s last names match all social security records, because your return will be rejected if they don’t. Also, if you’re divorced with children, be sure you know who’s claiming the kids. The rule is that whoever files first will initially get the credit and if it’s not the right person, correspondence with the IRS will be required by both parties to resolve the matter. To avoid that mess, it’s something you NEED to work out beforehand. Read more

The Postcard Filing – A Naïve, Misguided Fantasy

Eva Rosenberg, Tax Connections

The good news. President Trump Congress keeps telling you that taxpayers will be able to file on a postcard.

The bad news? Look at lines 3, 10, 11, and 12.
Your government is naïve. While this may be wish-fulfillment, it has no basis in practical reality.

It should be a required pre-requisite for all lawmakers to prepare their own income tax returns before they are permitted to write, vote on, or pass legislation. I loved that episode of the short-lived TV series Mr. Sterling, where Senator Bill Sterling (Josh Brolin)  is grumbling, trying to prepare his own tax return. Better yet, they should spent two weeks volunteering, or observing, at a VITA site to see how their tax laws truly affect low-income people’s tax filings. Read more

IRS Audits – How Are Tax Returns Selected for Audit?

Ron Marini

In order to determine how to respond to an IRS Tax Audit, it is helpful to understand how tax returns are selected for examination. The IRS selects returns for examinations in several ways, some based upon objective criteria coded into a carefully protected computer program and others based upon old fashioned investigation work.

Selection for an IRS Audit does not always suggest there’s a problem. The IRS uses several different methods: Read more

Canada Tax Help – Learn About A Schedule 20

What is a schedule 20 as part of a T2 corporate tax return?

Schedule 20 is used to calculate an additional tax on non-resident corporations. This tax is called Part 14 or ‘branch’ tax and relates to non-resident corporations that earn income from a business carried on in Canada (see International FAQ #24) and have a permanent establishment in Canada (see FAQ #127). Read more

Canada Tax FAQs – What Is A Schedule 91?

Grant Gilmour

What is a schedule 91 as part of a T2 corporate tax return?

Schedule 91 is for non-resident corporations that carried on business in Canada or disposal of taxable Canadian property in Canada that was treaty-protected any time in the year.

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2016 IRS Data Book Shows Chances Of Being Audited

Ephraim Moss

The IRS has published the 2016 version of its annual IRS Data Book, which contains statistical information about the IRS and taxpayer activities during the previous year. The IRS Data Book helps illustrate the breadth and complexity of the U.S. tax system. According to the Data Book, during fiscal year 2016 (Oct. 1, 2015 to Sept. 30, 2016), the IRS collected overall more than US$ 3.3 trillion from taxpayers, processed more than 244 million tax returns and other forms, and issued more than $426 billion in tax refunds.

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With The Deadline Closing In, Is It Time To Panic?

Ephraim Moss, tax deadline, fbar deadline

The first quarter of 2017 has come to an end, and this year’s tax due dates are now fast approaching. A quick review of the filing deadlines, however, should help U.S. expats understand that it’s not yet time to push the panic button.

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U.S. Expatriation – Tax Information When Renouncing

Larry Stolberg

Renunciation of U.S. citizenship is an expatriation event requiring the filing of IRS Form 8854 with your tax return for year of expatriation. Renunciation has a fee of US $2,350.

Renunciation is voluntary and requires an appointment for receiving a certificate of loss of nationality.

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Congressional Staffer Sentenced For Failure To File Tax Returns

William Byrnes

A congressional staffer was sentenced to prison today for willfully failing to file an individual income tax return, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Caroline D. Ciraolo, head of the Justice Department’s Tax Division, and U.S. Attorney Dana J. Boente for the Eastern District of Virginia.

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