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Tag Archive for Nanny Tax

Paying Taxes on Household Helpers

If you employ someone to work for you around your house, it is important to consider the tax implications of this arrangement. While many people disregard the need to pay taxes on household employees, they do so at the risk of paying stiff tax penalties down the road.

As you will see, the rules for hiring household help are quite complex, even for a relatively minor employee, and a mistake can bring on a tax headache that most of us would prefer to avoid.

Commonly referred to as the “nanny tax”, these rules apply to you only if (1) you pay someone for household work and (2) that worker is your employee.

Household work is work that is performed in or around your home by baby-sitters, Read more

If You Hire A Cook Or A Nanny – Are Employer Related Taxes Applicable?

If you hire someone to do household work and that person is considered your employee, you may be liable for paying employer related taxes. Although it is commonly called the “Nanny Tax” it covers more than just nannies, it includes workers who perform household work, which the IRS defines as “work done in or around your home”. This definition captures babysitters, yard workers, drivers, private nurses, private cooks, etc.

Your first task is to determine if the person you hired is your employee or is self-employed. The worker is your employee if you control what work is done and how it is done. The household worker may have been sent to you by an agency but if you control what work is done and how it is done the worker is still considered your employee. Whether the worker is part-time or full-time or is paid daily, weekly, hourly or for each job is not relevant once Read more

2014 Tax Fears & Advice

With my family snugly content amidst a long holiday season I felt compelled to pen some thoughts regarding the ubiquitous United States Tax Code and all its myriad of seemingly scary changes looming around the proverbial corner. This post lists ten tax matters to be aware of in the new year that have come up in conversations with clients. It also offers four recommendations to minimize tax obligations that I’ve found myself repeatedly trumpeting whenever asked. And finishes with some quick reference tax facts.

Be Aware:

1. For 2013 the self-employment tax has reverted back to its normal 15.3% rate, and the limit for the Social Security portion of the tax has increased to $113,700. Read more

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