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Deducting Other Miscellaneous Employee Business Expenses



Tips word in white 3d letters on a background of hundred dollar bills in cash money as a bonus, thank you or appreciation of excellent service

You may also be able to deduct the following miscellaneous expenses, if they were incurred in the normal course of carrying out your responsibilities as an employee:

• Business bad debt of an employee.
• Business liability insurance premiums.
• Damages paid to a former employer for breach of an employment contract.
• Depreciation on a computer your employer requires you to use in your work.
• Dues to a chamber of commerce if membership helps you do your job.
• Dues to professional societies.
• Job search expenses in your present occupation.
• Laboratory breakage fees.
• Legal fees related to your job.
• Licenses and regulatory fees.
• Malpractice insurance premiums.
• Medical examinations required by an employer.
• Occupational taxes.
• Passport for a business trip.
• Repayment of an income aid payment received under an employer’s plan.
• Research expenses of a college professor.
• Rural mail carriers’ vehicle expenses.
• Subscriptions to professional journals and trade magazines related to your work.
• Tools and supplies used in your work.
• Union dues and expenses.
• Work clothes and uniforms, if required, as long as they are not suitable for everyday use.

The primary objective of this article is to empower taxpayers to learn to do your own taxes. For detailed information on how to deduct your employee business expenses, grab yourself a copy of “Doing Your Own Taxes is as Easy as 1, 2, 3,” ($6.98) on TaxConnections.com.

Milton G Boothe is an IRS Enrolled Agent with over twenty years of tax and financial accounting experience, including several years at PricewaterhouseCoopers. He is also a British certified Chartered Accountant. He is currently employed in private tax practices where he helps people resolve their tax problems, minimize their taxes, and routinely represents the interests of taxpayers before the Internal Revenue Service. As an Enrolled Agent (EA) Boothe is a federally-authorized tax practitioner who has technical expertise in the field of taxation and who is empowered by the U.S. Department of the Treasury to represent taxpayers before all administrative levels of the IRS for audits, collections, and appeals.
Milton G Boothe is also the author of several tax publications, wherein he encourages people to empower themselves by learning to do their own taxes.

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