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Archive for Online Sales Tax

Georgia: New Sales Tax Compliance Requirements For Online Retailers

Georgia will require online retailers to file sales tax compliance returns beginning January 1, 2019, if their annual Georgia revenues exceed $250,000 or if they have more than 200 separate retail transactions within the state per calendar year.

As an alternative to collecting Georgia sales tax from its customers and filing sales tax compliance returns, the retailer may instead send “tax due” notices to all Georgia customers who purchased more than $500 of taxable goods during the year. The law, which originated as House Bill 61 and became Act 365, was signed by Governor Nathan Deal on May 8, 2018.

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Top Predictions You Need To Know: Wayfair V. South Dakota Onlines Sales Tax Case

As we wait for a decision in the Wayfair v. South DakotaSupreme Court Case regarding online sales tax, we thought it would be fun to take a look at possible outcomes depending on how the Court rules.

Our Opinion On The Online Sales Tax Case

Back in March we shared our predictions on how the online sales tax case’s outcome would affect businesses.

What if the Supreme Court rules against South Dakota? We’re back where we started with Quill remaining the physical presence standard and states passing various legislation that’s either unconstitutional (and likely not upheld) or that requires onerous reporting. Read more

The Latest In Online Sales Tax: Wayfair Vs. South Dakota Oral Arguments

Last week the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in the Wayfair v. South Dakota online sales tax case. While the court’s decision regarding the matter isn’t expected until June, the Justices’ questions in the matter reveal that it’s far from already settled, and they’re divided on whether or not Quill should be overruled.

South Dakota’s Arguments Regarding Quill

South Dakota’s Attorney General Marty Jackley began his statement, Read more

Wayfair Files Online Sales Tax Legal Brief: What You Need To Know

If you’ve been following the online sales tax debate with us, you know the Wayfair v. South Dakota case is going before the U.S. Supreme Court shortly; oral arguments are scheduled for next week (April 17).

In the meantime, Wayfair has filed a legal brief along with two other online retailers: Overstock Inc. and Newegg Inc. Keep reading for a brief summary of their argument for maintaining the Quill ruling from 1992. Read more

This Year’s Omnibus Bill: What About Internet Sales Tax?

Last week Congress passed the 2018 omnibus spending bill after finalizing the language at the last minute. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle, specifically Rep. Kristi Noem, were pushing to include online sales tax legislation, but ultimately the House’s chief deputy whip, Rep. Patrick McHenry, “Signaled…that Noem’s measure won’t be included in the omnibus and hasn’t had enough vetting.”

About The Online Sales Tax Provision

Rep. Noem made an aggressive push to add the online sales tax legislation to the bill last minute. As The Hill explains: Read more

Wayfair Vs. South Dakota: What Are The Possible Outcomes Of The Online Sales Tax Case?

Earlier this year we shared the U.S. Supreme Court would hear a case related to online sales tax: Wayfair v. South Dakota. This ruling could settle how online purchases are taxed, potentially overturning the 1992 Quill Corp v. North Dakota ruling currently preventing states from collecting sales tax from sellers without a physical presence (or nexus) in the state.

Why is it worth it for the Supreme Court to consider this case rather than fall back on the previous Quill ruling? The world has changed a lot since 1992. As The Wall Street Journal reports, “In 1992, the justices ‘did not and could not anticipate the development of modern e-commerce,’ Solicitor General Noel Francisco wrote in a friend-of the-court brief.” Read more

Rhode Island Online Sales Tax: What Should You Know?

As you know, the online sales tax debate continues across the country as states look for ways to collect fees from internet shoppers to increase their revenue. Rhode Island’s reporting law similar to Colorado’s, which makes customers responsible for paying the taxes, is now in effect.

About Rhode Island’s Online Sales Tax Law

Non-collecting retailers making in excess of $100,000 in sales or more than 200 sales (number of transactions) within the immediately preceding calendar year, are responsible for registering, collecting and remitting sales tax, or must do all of the following: Read more