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Archive for William Byrnes

Paycheck Protection Program Loan Forgiveness: The Devil Is In The Details

WILLIAM BYRNES

The devil is in the details, but where exactly? This week we are starting to see how the broad changes in the recent spate of COVID-19 legislation will be administered. We have new notices on loan forgiveness procedures (did you get your PPP loan yet?).

The Finer Points of PPP Loan Forgiveness

Loan forgiveness offers powerful assistance to those small businesses who were actually able to receive Paycheck Protection Program loan funds. However, loan forgiveness is not without its costs. While amounts forgiven will not be included in income under the usual cancellation of indebtedness rules, business owners may not be entitled to their typical business deductions either. Notice 2020-32 clarifies that otherwise allowable deductions are disallowed if the payment of the expense (1) results in loan forgiveness under the PPP loan program and (2) the income associated with the loan forgiveness is excluded from income under CARES Act Section 1106(i).

What are the tax consequences of loan forgiveness under the paycheck protection loan program?
Under normal circumstances, when a loan or debt is forgiven, the income is included in the debtor’s income under cancellation of debt principles. Paycheck protection loans, however, are excluded from these generally applicable rules—meaning that amounts forgiven are not included in the recipient’s income when forgiven.
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CARES Act Permits Penalty-Free Payroll Tax Deferral For Employers

William Byrnes

The CARES Act allows both employers and independent contractors to defer payment of employer payroll taxes without penalty. Importantly, employers with fewer than 500 employees are entitled to withhold payroll taxes as an advance repayment of the tax credit for paid sick leave and expanded FMLA leave under the FFCRA. Under the CARES Act payroll tax deferral, employers are permitted to defer the employer portion of the payroll tax on wages paid through December 31, 2020 for up to two years. Payroll taxes are generally due in two installments under CARES: 50% by December 31, 2021 and the remaining 50% by December 31, 2022. Economic hardship is presumed, meaning the employer does not have to produce documentation establishing that COVID-19 impacted the business. Payroll tax deferral options apparently apply to all employers, regardless of size. However, employers who have loans forgiven under the CARES Act Payroll Protection Loan program are not eligible for the deferral. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

William Byrnes

CARES Act Bonus Depreciation Fix: Amended Returns For Partnerships

CARES Act Bonus Depreciation Fix: Amended Returns For Partnerships

The CARES Act provided retroactive relief to partnerships on multiple fronts, including by fixing the so-called “retail glitch” to allow businesses to take advantage of 100% bonus depreciation on qualified improvement property through 2022. Existing law may have prevented partnerships from filing amended Forms 1065 and Schedules K-1. Instead, partnerships would have been required to file an administrative adjustment request, so that partners would not have received relief until filing returns for the current tax year. Revenue Procedure 2020-23 allows partnerships to file amended returns and issue revised Schedules K-1 for 2018 and 2019 to take advantage of retroactive CARES Act relief (and, absent further guidance, even if they are not taking advantage of CARES Act relief). For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Special Notice – IRS Just Issued Notice Denying Deductions for PPP Loan Forgiveness And It’s Dead Wrong

IRS Notice Denying Deductions For PPP Loan Forgiveness

The IRS released on April 30th Notice 2020-32 wherein the IRS interprets general tax law principles to deny business deductions (under Internal Revenue Code Section 162) for the wage and related expenses when the business takes advantage of the SBA’s PPP loan forgiveness.

The IRS Notice is a wrong interpretation of how CARES Section 1106 (see below) and by implication, Internal Revenue Code Section 108 (discharge of indebtedness), works, as well as how Congress intends CARES to work. Congress clearly intends CARES’ SBA loan proceeds to ameliorate Covid-19s damage to small business’ earnings (and thus mitigate the Covid-19 economic recession) by pushing cash flow into, and through, small business.
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CARES Act: Penalty-Free Payroll Tax Deferral For Employers

Payroll Tax Deferral

The CARES Act allows both employers and independent contractors to defer payment of employer payroll taxes without penalty. Importantly, employers with fewer than 500 employees are entitled to withhold payroll taxes as an advance repayment of the tax credit for paid sick leave and expanded FMLA leave under the FFCRA. Under the CARES Act payroll tax deferral, employers are permitted to defer the employer portion of the payroll tax on wages paid through December 31, 2020 for up to two years. Payroll taxes are generally due in two installments under CARES: 50 percent by December 31, 2021 and the remaining 50 percent by December 31, 2022. Economic hardship is presumed, meaning the employer does not have to produce documentation establishing that COVID-19 impacted the business. Payroll tax deferral options apparently apply to all employers, regardless of size. However, employers who have loans forgiven under the CARES Act Payroll Protection Loan program are not eligible for the deferral. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

William Byrnes

CARES ACT: NOL Relief For Struggling Businesses

CARES Act: NOL Relief for Struggling Businesses

The CARES Act allows corporations to carry back net operating losses (NOLs) incurred in 2018, 2019, and 2020 for five years (excluding offset to untaxed foreign earnings transition tax). Post-tax reform, these NOLs could only be carried forward. For tax years beginning prior to January 1, 2021, businesses can offset 100% of taxable income with NOL carryovers and carrybacks (the 80 percent taxable income limitation was lifted). With respect to partnerships and pass-through entities, the CARES Act amended the effective date for the new excess business loss rules created by the 2017 tax reform legislation. The new rules will only apply beginning in 2021 (rather than 2018). Pass-through taxpayers who have filed a return reflecting excess business losses will presumably be entitled to refund by filing an amended return, absent guidance to the contrary. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online.

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Have a question? William Byrnes

Covid-19 Tax Legislation Updates: Business Interest Deductions, Student Loan Payments And Paid Time Off

William Byrnes - Covid -19 Tax Legislation

More on the COVID-19 legislation and related administrative guidance from the DOL. This week we have updates on business interest deductions, student loan payment info, and DOL guidance on the PTO that was mandated by the new legislation. Are you keeping up?

CARES Act: Business Interest Deduction Relief
The CARES Act increases the 30% of adjusted taxable income (ATI) limit on the business interest deduction (as imposed under the 2017 tax reform law) to 50% for corporations in 2019 and 2020. All entities (corporations and pass-throughs) can elect to use 2019 ATI instead of 2020 ATI in determining the 2020 business interest expense deduction, which could increase the business interest deduction for businesses who are likely to see reduced income levels in 2020. For more information, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

CARES Act Offers Tax-Preferred Student Loan Repayment Assistance Option
The CARES Act includes a provision that gives employers a way to offer tax-preferred student loan repayment assistance to employees. The Act changes the definition of “educational assistance” in IRC Section 127 to also include employer payments to employees of student loan principal or interest. The payments must currently be made before January 1, 2021. The maximum benefit permitted is a $5,250 payment in 2020 (tax-free). For more information on the requirements for establishing a tax-preferred education assistance program, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

DOL Guidance on Notice Requirements Related to Expanded COVID-19 Paid Time Off
The DOL has released a notice that all employers must conspicuously post to give employees information about federal relief efforts related to COVID-19. The DOL FAQ notes that when employees are working remotely, employers can email or mail the relevant notices. The notice must be provided to all current employees, but only must be provided in English absent future guidance (a Spanish language notice is available on the DOL website). For more information on the COVID-19 relief efforts, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Have a question? Contact William Byrnes.

Will New York’s Businesses Suffer Because The State Tax System Rejected Adopting The CARES Act Tax Reliefs?

William Byrnes

Anything that improves the employment of tax professionals, I am for. Thus, states with their own tax codes that do not correspond to the federal Internal Revenue Code, at least for my students and alumni, are OK by me. Unless I own a business. Then it’s maddeningly complex, and compliance expensive, to operate in several tax regimes.

Not saying that the CARES Act provisions made good tax policy sense. But unless New York state (and city) has something better to offer, the Covid-19 meltdown does not seem like an opportune time to ‘stick it’ to Congress’ because Congress seems to enact ineffectual tax provisions. Not that the typical New York voter understands or cares about 163(j) relief or NOL. And arguably, most voters do not feel sympathy for the large business and investment partnership vehicles (at least until I remind them that it is their retirement accounts that own the majority of the publicly held businesses and investment vehicles, and thus they’ll be working a little longer than they hoped for).

New York based business in particular may come to understand when the CPA / tax advisor informs that on the federal return Covid-19 stimulus relief is allowable but not so on the NY state return. Some NY based businesses are going to feel that their state didn’t have their backs. Other businesses that are large enough and able because of industry to relocate operations have time a plenty at this moment to think about such relocation. (Texas will be open for business again soon).
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Brand Rights: What Type Of Taxable Income? Royalties Or Business Income?

William Byrnes

The Tax Court recently decided a case, Slaughter v. Comm’r (find all the citations in 1 Taxation of Intellectual Property § 1.06 (2019), involving annual royalty payments to an author wherein the IRS argued that instead of treating the payments as royalties that are not subject to self-employment and Medicare tax, the payments should be treated as net earnings from self-employment. The dispute that the Tax Court faced was whether there is a distinction, for self-employment tax purposes, between an author’s royalty income derived from her writing and any royalty income derived from her name and likeness. The author contends that one portion of her royalty payments is derived from her writing, which is a trade or business, and that another portion is derived, not from her writing, but rather solely from her name and likeness which are personal attributes which are not part of any trade or business. The IRS argued that the entire payments the author received from her publishing contracts were derived from her trade or business as an author, thus subject to self-employment tax.

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199A Rental Real Estate Safe Harbor Excludes Certain Businesses

William Byrnes

Not all taxpayers will be able to take advantage of the Section 199A safe harbor for rental real estate. While the safe harbor does apply to residential rental real estate, taxpayers are not entitled to rely upon the safe harbor if the taxpayer uses the property as a residence during the tax year.

Notably, if the real estate is rented or leased under a triple net lease, the safe harbor remains unavailable under the final rule. When satisfying the “hours of rental real estate services” criteria, only certain activities are counted toward the 250-hour threshold. Activities such as rent collection, advertising the rental, property maintenance, negotiating leases and managing the real property generally count toward the threshold. However, the taxpayer’s activities as an “investor” are not counted.

Similarly, if any property within the rental real estate enterprise is classified as a specified service trade or business, the safe harbor is unavailable for the entire business. For more information on the final safe harbor rule, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Have a question? Contact William R Byrnes

 

April 1st Important Deadline For Clients With First-Time Required Minimum Distribution (RMD) Obligations

William Byrnes 3

While April 15 is a well-known and understood deadline, most clients don’t associate April 1 with any important tax-related deadlines—but April 1 is, in fact, one of the most important deadlines for clients who turned 70 1/2 years old in the previous year. For those clients who maintain traditional retirement accounts, such as 401(k)s and IRAs, April 1 is the date by which they must take their first required minimum distribution (RMD) from the account if they turned 701/2 in the previous year.

For example, a client who turned 701/2 in 2018 must take their first RMD by April 1, 2019. This April 1 deadline is a special rule that applies only to first-time RMDs–a client’s 2019 RMD will be due by December 31, 2019. This means that clients who choose to wait until the April 1 deadline will be required to take two RMDs in 2019. For each subsequent year, the generally applicable December 31 deadline is the relevant date for RMDs. For more information on lifetime RMD requirements, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Written By William Byrnes

 

 

 

Common Scenarios In Client Retirement Planning: Account Consolidation And The Rules Of The Road

William Byrnes 2

Most clients will change jobs a few times in their lives, which often means they wind up with multiple 401(k) and other types of retirement plans. Consolidating can produce many benefits–namely, making it easier to manage retirement assets and easing RMD calculations, but there are rules to consolidating and clients also need to be aware of benefits that may be unique to any one type of plan. Clients should evaluate their goals with respect to eventual withdrawals, as the rules for penalty-free withdrawals–for example, via using an IRA to establish a series of substantially equal periodic payments to provide penalty-free withdrawals prior to age 591/2.

For more information on the rollover rules and how they may impact clients considering retirement account consolidation, visit Tax Facts Online. Read More

Written By William Byrnes