TaxConnections


 

Tag Archive for Expats

Trump Tax Reform Bill Analysis – What Does It Mean For US Expats?

Hugo Lesser, Tax Advisor

On November 2nd, the House of Representatives unveiled the first draft of the Trump Tax Reform Bill. Here we look at how it will affect expats.

Citizen Based Taxation and FATCA 

There is no mention in the draft Tax Reform Bill of any change to citizen based taxation for individuals, or of repealing FATCA.

It is proposed that corporations are only taxed on their US profits (rather than globally), as taxing corporations globally has (conversely to expectations) reduced government revenue, as globally operating firms have simply relocated to other countries with more favorable tax regimes.

Despite ACA (American Citizens Abroad) lobbying to make a similar change away from global taxation for expat individuals, there is no mention of this in the draft bill. Read more

Top 3 Reasons US Expats Should Catch Up With Their IRS Tax Filing Using the Streamlined Procedure

Hugo Lesser, Tax Advisor

Living abroad is an incredible adventure that inevitably broadens our horizons and minds, thanks to the perspective we gain from living in a foreign country and experiencing a new culture.Living abroad is an incredible adventure that inevitably broadens our horizons and minds, thanks to the perspective we gain from living in a foreign country and experiencing a new culture.

Read more

What You Need To Know About Voluntary Disclosure

There are around 9 million Americans living oversees, and the IRS has its sights set on those expats who aren’t up to date with their U.S. tax filing.

All American citizens and green card holders are required to file a U.S. tax return, however because the U.S. is the only developed nation to tax its non-resident citizens, many haven’t realized that they have to file. Read more

IRS Cautions Against Over-reliance On Its Website

National Taxpayer Advocate Nina Olson discussed the potential pitfalls of treating information on the IRS’s website, such as its FAQs pages, as authoritative. The Taxpayer Advocate is an independent office within the IRS tasked with helping people resolve tax issues with the IRS and recommending changes that will prevent future problems.

Read more

Court Blocks Attempt To Transfer From OVDP To Streamlined

Ephraim Moss

In a very recent decision (Maze v. IRS), the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a lower court decision blocking several taxpayers’ efforts to leave the OVDP tax amnesty program and enter the friendlier IRS Streamlined program without utilizing the required transition rules.

The Maze case demonstrates the importance of choosing the IRS tax amnesty program that is right for you from the outset. Read more

How Can American Expats Reduce Their IRS Taxes?

Hugo Lesser

Americans living abroad are still required to file U.S. taxes. The U.S. is the only country that requires its expats to file. It is because the U.S. taxes based on citizenship rather than on residence. Read more

U.S. Expat Taxes For Americans Living In Ireland

Hugo Lesser

It has been estimated that there are several thousand Americans living in Ireland.

Living in Ireland is an incredible experience for a number of reasons, including the friendly locals, the incredible landscapes, the charming culture, not to mention easy access to the rest of Europe. As an American expatriate living in Ireland though, what exactly do you need to know regarding filing U.S. expat (and Irish) taxes?

Read more

Establishing Same Country Exemption Through Legislation

John Richardson

The Maloney Approach

This is a continuation from a previous article, FATCA’s Same Country Exemption Won’t Work.

On April 25, 2017 Congresswoman Maloney introduced H.R. 2136: “To amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide an exception from certain reporting requirements with respect to the foreign accounts of individuals who live abroad.”

Read more

Potential Consequences For US Expats Of The Trump Tax Plan

Ephraim Moss

The Trump administration has revealed its official tax reform plan. While it’s clear that the plan would make drastic changes to the current U.S. tax system, the brevity of the plan leaves a host of ancillary issues and details either unclarified or unaddressed in the one-page document. This is particularly true for expats – the tax plan gives little insight into whether changes will be sought by the administration that specifically address U.S. expat concerns.

Read more

Form 8621 And 5471 Are Required Even If The Tax Return Isn’t!

John Richardson

The Internal Revenue Code of the United States requires two things:

1. The calculation of taxes; and

2. The reporting of information.

The Internal Revenue Code of the United States is based on three basic principles:

1. A dislike of all things “foreign”. (If you see the word “foreign” a penalty is sure to follow.)

2. A hatred of all forms of non-U.S. “tax deferral”

3. An attempt to stop the “leakage” of “U.S. taxable assets” from the U.S. tax base. (Examples include the U.S. tax treatment of the “alien spouse” and the U.S. S. 877A “Exit Tax” that may be payable when one makes the decision to renounce U.S. citizenship).

Read more

With The Deadline Closing In, Is It Time To Panic?

Ephraim Moss, tax deadline, fbar deadline

The first quarter of 2017 has come to an end, and this year’s tax due dates are now fast approaching. A quick review of the filing deadlines, however, should help U.S. expats understand that it’s not yet time to push the panic button.

Read more

‘Justice Delayed Is Justice Denied’?

Wighead English jurist William Gladstone, the author of this famous quote, was obviously not a criminal defense lawyer. In many, if not most, cases, delay is a fundamental element of a successful defense, or even the lynchpin of the entire schmear. Over time, memories fade, evidence is lost (or at least becomes more difficult to find and use in court), witnesses relocate, and prosecutors lose interest in the case. All of these developments weigh in favor of criminal defendants.

To paraphrase Gordon Gekko: Delay is good. Delay is right; delay works. So, there were champagne corks popping all along Wall Street and into the uttermost parts of the earth when the IRS announced that it would delay certain FATCA bank withholding requirements until 2019. However, it remains to be seen whether the delay is a legitimate reprieve or Read more

TaxConnections