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Archive for IRS Notice

IRS Issues Standard Mileage Rates For 2020

2020 Standard Mileage Rates

The Internal Revenue Service issued the 2020 optional standard mileage rates used to calculate the deductible costs of operating an automobile for business, charitable, medical or moving purposes.

Beginning on Jan. 1, 2020, the standard mileage rates for the use of a car (also vans, pickups or panel trucks) will be:

  • 57.5 cents per mile driven for business use, down one half of a cent from the rate for 2019,
  • 17 cents per mile driven for medical or moving purposes, down three cents from the rate for 2019, and
  • 14 cents per mile driven in service of charitable organizations.

The business mileage rate decreased one half of a cent for business travel driven and three cents for medical and certain moving expense from the rates for 2019. The charitable rate is set by statute and remains unchanged.

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Important Things To Know About IRS Tax Refunds

IRS

As tax filing season approaches, the Internal Revenue Service cautions taxpayers not to rely on receiving their refund by a certain date, especially when making major purchases or paying bills. Some tax returns may require additional review and those refunds may take longer.

Many Factors Affect Refund Timing

Just as each tax return is unique and individual, so is each taxpayer’s refund. Here are a few things taxpayers should keep in mind if they are waiting on their refund but hear or see on social media that other taxpayers have already received theirs.

Different factors can affect the timing of a refund. The IRS, along with its partners in the tax industry, continue to strengthen security reviews to help protect against identity theft and refund fraud.

Even though the IRS issues most refunds in less than 21 days, it’s possible a particular taxpayer’s refund may take longer. Some tax returns require additional review and take longer to process than others. It may be necessary when a return has errors, is incomplete or is affected by identity theft or fraud. The IRS will contact taxpayers by mail when more information is needed to process a return.

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Treasury, IRS Issue Final Regulations On The Foreign Tax Credit

IRS - Treasury, IRS Issue Final Regulations On The Foreign Tax Credit

The Internal Revenue Service issued final regulations on the Foreign Tax Credit, a long-standing tax benefit that generally allows individuals and businesses to claim a credit for income taxes paid or accrued to foreign governments.

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) made major changes to the tax law, including revamping the U.S. international tax system. Specifically, several Foreign Tax Credit provisions were changed, including repeal of section 902, which allowed deemed-paid credits in connection with dividend distributions based on foreign subsidiaries’ cumulative pools of earnings and foreign taxes. TCJA also added two separate limitation categories for foreign branch income and amounts includible under the Global Intangible Low-Taxed Income (GILTI) provisions.

Additionally, the TCJA changed how taxable income is calculated for purposes of the Foreign Tax Credit limitation by disregarding certain expenses and repealing the use of the fair market value method for allocating interest expense.

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Important Things To Know About Tax Credits

IRS LOGO

With the tax filing season quickly approaching, the Internal Revenue Service recommends taxpayers take time now to determine if they are eligible for important tax credits.

This is the second in a series of reminders to help taxpayers Get Ready for the upcoming tax filing season. The IRS recently updated its Get Ready page with steps to take now for the 2020 filing season.

Earned Income Tax Credit

The Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable federal income tax credit for working people with low to moderate incomes who meet certain eligibility requirements. Because it’s a refundable credit, those who qualify and claim EITC pay less federal tax, pay no tax or may even get a tax refund. EITC can mean a credit of up to $6,557 for working families with three or more qualifying children. Workers without a qualifying child may be eligible for a credit up to $529.

To get the credit, people must have earned income and file a federal tax return — even if they don’t owe any tax or aren’t otherwise required to file.

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What Is A CDP Hearing And What It Does For You

If for some reason, you find yourself defaulting on a tax payment or two, the IRS will take steps to recover that debt. This could be through IRS levies, allowing them to seize your assets, taking money from your accounts or through a Notice of Federal Tax Lien (NFTL). By law, the IRS must inform you before any collection efforts are made, and after filing an NFTL.

What Is A CDP Hearing?

After the IRS makes it known to you that they intend to initiate steps to recover what you owe, you can request a hearing to discuss your case. At the hearing, you get to find out whether there were any procedural issues on the IRS’s side or propose alternative methods of collection. So, a CDP hearing is a last-ditch effort to avoid the penalties altogether or offer payment alternatives that would be easier on you. It’s important to note, though, that most CDP hearings discuss alternative collection methods. So your chances of getting away without making payments are slim.

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10 Common IRS Notices That You Are Likely To Encounter And What They Mean

Venar Ayar

No one likes when the IRS reaches out to them. The agency is like that one neighbor you never liked as a kid who never got the hint and just kept coming over. Chances are, he’s gonna call today too. The IRS sends millions of letters each year to taxpayers who, quite frankly, don’t ever want to hear from them. And even though you don’t even want to listen to their voice, they have a whole lot of crucial stuff to say. So strap in and get ready for a somewhat boring but extremely important ride.

So what’s up with these notices then?

Glad you asked. The IRS sends out these reasons for a couple of reasons, some good, some not so good. One of the reasons you got mail from them might be:

  • The IRS changed your return.
  • The IRS needs additional information from you.
  • They have a question about your tax return.
  • You are due a larger or smaller return.
  • The IRS needs to verify your identity.
  • You are being notified of delays in processing your return.

Now, don’t panic once you receive your letter. It’s a treasure trove of information, so make sure you go through it very carefully.  Let’s look at ten notices that the IRS might send you.

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IRS Wants To Hear From Large Corporate Taxpayers Interested In Applying For The Compliance Assurance Process

IRS Compliance

The Internal Revenue Service is asking publicly-traded corporate taxpayers interested in applying to the Compliance Assurance Process (CAP) in 2020 to provide a statement of interest.

Launched in 2005, CAP improves federal tax compliance by resolving issues prior to the filing of a tax return through open, cooperative and transparent interactions between the IRS and taxpayers. New applicants to CAP have not been accepted since 2015.

The statement of interest is a precursor to the formal application process that takes place in the fall of 2019. The IRS will use the information provided in the statements of interest by potential applicants to help determine the approach for expanding CAP in 2020.

For details on CAP eligibility, criteria and instructions, please refer to the statement of interest web page

 

 

New Rules And Limitations For Depreciation And Expensing Under The Tax Cuts And Jobs Act

IRS Rules And Limitations For Expensing
Businesses Can Expense More Under The New Law

A taxpayer may elect to expense the cost of any section 179 property and deduct it in the year the property is placed in service. The new law increased the maximum deduction from $500,000 to $1 million. It also increased the phase-out threshold from $2 million to $2.5 million. For taxable years beginning after 2018, these amounts of $1 million and $2.5 million will be adjusted for inflation.

The new law also expands the definition of section 179 property to allow the taxpayer to elect to include the following improvements made to nonresidential real property after the date when the property was first placed in service:

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Changes To Depreciation And Expensing For Businesses

IRS LOGO ON EXPENSES

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act changed some laws on depreciation and expensing. These changes can affect a business’s tax situation. Here are the highlights:

  • Businesses can immediately expense more under the new law.
  • Temporary 100 percent expensing for certain business assets (first year bonus depreciation).
  • Changes to depreciation limitations on luxury automobiles and personal use property.
  • The treatment of certain farm property changed.
  • Applicable recovery period for real property.
  • Use of alternative depreciation system for farming businesses.

Taxpayers can use a safe harbor method to figure depreciation deductions for passenger automobiles qualifying for the 100-percent additional first year depreciation deduction and subject to depreciation limitations. The safe harbor allows depreciation deductions for the excess amount during the recovery period subject to depreciation limitations applicable to passenger automobiles. To apply the safe-harbor method, the taxpayers must use the applicable depreciation table in Appendix A of Publication 946, How to Depreciate Property. The safe harbor method doesn’t apply to a passenger automobile for which the taxpayer elected out of the 100-percent additional first year depreciation deduction or elected to expense all or a portion of the cost of the passenger automobile.

Find more details in FS-2018-9, New rules and limitations for depreciation and expensing under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, and Additional First Year Depreciation Deduction (Bonus) – FAQ.

 

 

Understanding Your IRS Notice Or Letter

IRS Notices

Your IRS notice or letter will explain the reason for the contact and give you instructions on how to handle the issue.

If you agree with the information, there is no need to contact us.

Enter your notice or letter number above to get more information on IRS notices and letters, along with answers to many notice-related questions. If your notice or letter doesn’t return a result using the Notices & Letters Search on this page, contact us at the toll-free number 800-829-1040.

Why Was I Notified By The IRS?

The IRS sends notices and letters for the following reasons:

  • You have a balance due.
  • You are due a larger or smaller refund.
  • We have a question about your tax return.
  • We need to verify your identity.
  • We need additional information.
  • We changed your return.
  • We need to notify you of delays in processing your return.

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