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Tag Archive for Tax Brackets

2016 Year End Tax Planning: What To Expect?

Manasa Nadig

When that first leaf changes color, there’s a nip in the air, and the sunshine starts to fall into corners it did not before, you know the year is coming to an end. Typically that is when I start getting phone calls for year-end tax planning.

This year has been tumultuous, to say the least, as we recover from all the pre- and post-election trauma or elation depending on which candidate you favored. We need to put our tax plans in place based on what we know about likely tax changes for 2017 and 2018.

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A New President With Promises Of Tax Reforms

Barry Fowler

It’s a new dawn, a new day, and we have a new President.
Whether we enjoy the benefits of the reforms he has promised remains to be seen. For those of you who are not aware of the promises Trump has made regarding tax reform, I’ve provided them for you below.

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2015: Year End – Tax Planning For Individuals, What To Expect!

It’s November! I am always surprised by it’s arrival and the realization that it’s year-end tax planning time. The shortened day-light hours seem to make that certain without a doubt. So let’s roll-up our sleeves, get down to work and fine-tune possible last-minute strategies for lowering your 2015 tax bill.

Tax Brackets: Let’s take a quick look at the 2015 tax brackets, you will see from the table below that the top tax rate of 39.6% will apply to incomes over $$413,200 (single), $464,851 (married filing jointly and surviving spouse), $232,426 (married filing separately), and $439,000 (heads of households):

The 3.8% net investment income tax and/or the 0.9% Medicare surtax will also apply if you Read more

Tax Brackets, Deductions, And Exemptions For 2015

More than 40 tax provisions, including the tax rate schedules, and other tax changes are adjusted for inflation in 2015. Let’s take a look at the ones most likely to affect taxpayers like you.

The tax rate of 39.6 percent affects singles whose income exceeds $413,200 ($464,850 for married taxpayers filing a joint return), up from $406,750 and $457,600, respectively. The other marginal rates–10, 15, 25, 28, 33 and 35 percent–and the related income tax thresholds are described in the revenue procedure.

The standard deduction rises to $6,300 for singles and married persons filing separate returns and $12,600 for married couples filing jointly, up from $6,200 and $12,400, Read more

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