TaxConnections

 
 

After Tax Reform, Which Is Right For You: S Corp or C Corp?



Charles Woodson, S- Corp Or C-Corp

The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act has left many of today’s businesses with big questions. Incorporation remains a hot topic, but this law is shaking things up. It’s quick to assume your company should be one or the other, but without careful consideration of the facts, your organization may end up facing financial loss, hefty tax penalties or missed tax savings.

The goal of this type of incorporation is to minimize tax burdens, but the wrong decision can be costly. In a C Corp, the company pays corporate taxes to the Internal Revenue Service. But, in an S Corp, there’s no entity tax. Rather, taxes are paid through an individual return.

The New Law Changes

The new law, which went into effect for the 2018 tax year, brought changes to both S Corp and C Corpbusinesses. In fact, both types of corporations benefited here. For C Corps, the tax rate was dropped from 35 percent down to just 21 percent. For an S Corp the new law provides a deduction equal to 20% of the pass-through income from the corp subject to limitations for higher-income taxpayers. At best, this reduces the effective tax rate to 29.6 percent from 37 percent. In both cases, there are specific restrictions here to know.

One thing to remember about these tax changes is that there are many components to determining which method is right for your business. Don’t make a quick judgment here. Rather, invest in some one-on-one time with your tax professional to determine the best possible scenario for your individual company. To help, consider these key areas.

S Corp and C Corp Ownership

A key component in deciding how to incorporate your business relates to ownership. In the S Corp, there is a limit of 100 shareholders within the company. These must be domestic organizations operated in the United States where all of the company’s shareholders are also living in the United States. Additionally, this structure allows for a single stock classification. As a business, you cannot offer common stocks as well as preferred shares, for example.

Comparatively, C Corps allow for fewer restrictions. There is no limit on ownership at all. There is no limit on the number of shareholders the company can have. Any small- to a medium-sized company planning an IPO or simply obtain investors outside of the traditional domestic structure will find C Corps offer far more flexibility.

Another key factor about C Corps relates to the differences within your shareholders. These corporations can issue several types of stock. As a result, it is not uncommon for some shareholder votes to be more important than others. This, too, can influence the decision you make in choosing one or the other model.

Corporation Taxation – Choosing the Best Taxation Structure

Most companies will focus most of their decision on S Corp or C Corp options based on ownership as a starting point. However, every company also wants to keep costs low. Taxation is one of the most expensive hurdles any organization must manage. And, each type of structure offers a different look.

For example, consider how a C Corp is taxed. It is commonly referred to as a “double taxation structure.” This is because the company (the entity itself) will pay a corporate tax. Then, the stockholders pay taxes on their income from the business. While this has long been a concern for any business owner using the C Corp structure (paying taxes twice on income is very costly), the new tax law changes this a bit. As noted previously, the tax rate for C Corp has changed from 35 percent to just 21 percent. However, the dividends will still be faced with double taxation.

The slashing to 21 percent means every company is paying the same rate, neither the size of the company nor the type of organization matters. That’s an important consideration when choosing which type of structure is right for your company.

With the help of a tax professional, it is also important to consider other tax strategies available. For example, an S Corp shareholder pays taxes every year on the money the company earns during that year. This is a simpler, straightforward scenario. But, in a C Corp, the taxes are only paid when the company decides to distribute dividends. It can also occur if a shareholder realizes capital gains (such as when selling ownership). This provides the C Corp with an ability to minimize taxes just by timing dividends properly.

Making the Right Decision for Your Needs

This is only the very top edge of considerations for which is best for your company. However, there are a few things that can influence your decision.

Stable Small Businesses

If you own a smaller company, you’ll benefit from an S Corporation for various reasons. First, the income passes through and is taxable to the stockholders on their 1040s, thereby eliminating double taxation. Plus the lower tax rate and the 20% pass-through deduction are very beneficial to an S-Corporation structure.

Growing Small Businesses

If your company is growing – or you plan to go public and take on new ownership, the C Corporation offers the opportunity to do so. It allows for a larger number of investors, and international investments are possible. Additionally, as a smaller business, you may not be likely to issue dividends any time soon. As a result, this can reduce the amount of income reported to the IRS on an annual basis.

Larger Companies

For larger organizations, the C Corp tends to offer the best structure overall. Other options limit investor access and may create scenarios where the company cannot grow. The effective tax rate is significantly lower – competitive to any company no matter the size. The new tax reform provides the most advantages to this buyer in particular.

Making the Decision for Your Needs

Many organizations today have jumped on the new tax reform as an opportunity to incorporate more tax savings. However, a clear picture is important. It’s important to slow down before making any type of drastic decisions like this. They have far-reaching implications and can create a financial burden or limitations on an organization if the wrong decision occurs. However, with the help of a tax professional or attorney, it is possible to make better decisions based specifically on the type of business structure you have, the business’s short-term and long-term goals, as well as new laws and taxation rates. Before you make a change as an entrepreneur, know what you are really getting.

Have tax questions? Contact Charles Woodson.

 

 

 

Chuck Woodson

Leading Expert and Fiduciary Coach to families dealing with trusts and estates. Contact me to handle all trust and estate matters seamlessly for you.

Contact Tax Advisor/Fiduciary Coach Chuck Woodson at 858.277.8780