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Tag Archive for U.S. Tax Guide For Foreign Nationals

US Tax Guide For Foreign Nationals Working Or Investing In The United States

US Tax Guide For Foreign Nationals Working Or Investing In The United States

This guide is dedicated to helping you comply with US tax laws if you are a foreign national (resident or nonresident alien) working or investing in the US.  We take you through the substantial presence test and show you how to determine your US tax resident status. Regardless of your visa status, you will learn about the US resident tests for tax purposes, which are different than for immigration purposes.

If you are a nonresident alien, investing in US real estate or other US business activities from your home country, we give you an overview of deductions and credits available on Form 1040NR. We explain your tax filing options. For example, in the year of arrival, you might qualifiy for a dual status, resident or nonresident tax return.

You will also learn the more complex tax rules that apply if you are an F1 or J1 visa holder. Then we give you an overview of tax treaty benefits, which are particularly useful for F1 and J1 visa holders. Finally, you will learn about ITIN requirements, state tax requirements and social security and Medicare tax withholding rules.

For most Americans, completing their tax return is a confusing and frustrating exercise. We can only imagine how ominous the task must seem for you, a foreign visitor. Hopefully the information you find here will make the job easier.

Form 1040NR Filing Requirements

Who Needs to File a US Tax Return?

 

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United States Tax Guide For Foreign Nationals

GARY CARTER PHOTO

This guide is dedicated to helping you comply with US tax laws if you are a foreign national (resident or nonresident alien) working or investing in the US.  We take you through the substantial presence test and show you how to determine your US tax resident status. Whether you are an H1b, L1, O1, or other non-immigrant visa holder, you will learn about the US resident tests for tax purposes, which are different than for immigration purposes.

If you are a nonresident alien, investing in US real estate or other US business activities from your home country, we give you an overview of deductions and credits available on Form 1040NR, with plenty of additional resources provided. We explain your tax filing options on a dual status or resident tax return if you have obtained permanent resident (green card) status.

You will also learn the more complex tax rules that apply if you are an F1 or J1 visa holder. Then we give you an overview of tax treaty benefits, which are particularly useful for F1 and J1 visa holders. Finally, you will learn about ITIN requirements, state tax requirements and social security and Medicare tax withholding rules. For most Americans, completing their tax return is a confusing and frustrating exercise. We can only imagine how ominous the task must seem for you, a foreign visitor. Hopefully the information you find here will make the job easier.

Read more

United States Tax Guide For Foreign Nationals

GARY CARTER _U.S. Tax Guide For Foreign Nationals

This guide is dedicated to helping you comply with US tax laws if you are a foreign national (resident or nonresident alien) working or investing in the US.  We take you through the substantial presence test and show you how to determine your US tax resident status. Whether you are an H1b, L1, O1, or other non-immigrant visa holder, you will learn about the US resident tests for tax purposes, which are different than for immigration purposes.

If you are a nonresident alien, investing in US real estate or other US business activities from your home country, we give you an overview of deductions and credits available on Form 1040NR, with plenty of additional resources provided. We explain your tax filing options on a dual status or resident tax return if you have obtained permanent resident (green card) status.

You will also learn the more complex tax rules that apply if you are an F1 or J1 visa holder. Then we give you an overview of tax treaty benefits, which are particularly useful for F1 and J1 visa holders. Finally, you will learn about ITIN requirements, state tax requirements and social security and Medicare tax withholding rules. For most Americans, completing their tax return is a confusing and frustrating exercise. We can only imagine how ominous the task must seem for you, a foreign visitor. Hopefully the information you find here will make the job easier.

Form 1040NR Filing Requirements

Who Needs to File a US Tax Return?

If you are a nonresident alien doing business or working in the United States, you are required to file a tax return. To “file a tax return” means to send your completed and signed tax return to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), either through the mail or electronically. If you work or invest in a state that has an income tax, a state tax return will also be required. This is a separate document you must prepare and send to a state tax authority. See the section below about State Taxation.

You are considered to be engaged in a business even if you are an employee working for wages. If you are a student or scholar entering the US as an F, J, M or Q visa holder, and are classified as a nonresident, you are deemed to be engaged in a trade or business. Therefore, you need to file a Federal income tax return each year if you have any income subject to US income tax.  Additionally, if you are an exempt individual (explained under “Residency Status” below), you are required to file Form 8843 regardless of your income.  Here is a description of the forms you are required to file:

  • Form 1040NRU.S. Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return, or if you qualify, Form 1040NR-EZU.S. Income Tax Return for Certain Nonresident Aliens With No Dependents, and
  • For exempt individuals, Form 8843Statement for Exempt Individuals and Individuals with a Medical Condition.

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