TaxConnections


 

Tax Alert (USA) – US Tax Cuts & Jobs Act

On November 2, 2017, the US Congress House Ways and Means Committee unveiled the tax reform plan called the Tax Cuts & Jobs Act.  The bill aims to simplify the Internal Revenue Code and introduce tax savings for the average American family.  Although it is unlikely that the legislation will make it through Congress unscathed, it does provide a more detailed blueprint of the tax reforms that the citizens would like to enact.  Below are highlights of the proposed changes. Read More

The Trump Tax Reform — What A US Citizen In Israel Should Know

One of the pressing issues of President-elect Donald Trump’s campaign was his proposed tax reform. It is clear that not everything will be passed into law, and in fact changes were made over the course of the presidential race before arriving at the current proposal.  Of course, it is too early to know exactly what will change and by how much, but it is clear that some major changes will be made. With the backing of a Republican majority in both the House and Senate, it should not take long for these changes to happen. Furthermore, many of the changes are not significantly different than previously proposed tax reforms by some Congressmen, which should help ease their passage into law. Read More

AMT Credits: A Refundable Carryforward…Subject To Limitation?

With its extensive changes and immediate effects, the December 2017 enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) has taxpayers seeking guidance on the Act’s potential impact to their businesses. Uncertainty results from the interaction of certain new provisions of the tax law with unchanged provisions. One example of this uncertainty is the question of whether alternative minimum tax (AMT) credits remain subject to potential limitation under section 383 of the Tax Code now that the AMT credits have been made “refundable” – i.e., capable of generating refunds for taxpayers without overall taxable income for the year. Read More

Reporting Casualties Under The New US Personal Income Tax Regimen- Thefts Not So Much

The new Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA) amends Internal Revenue Code Section 165further restricting our ability as individual taxpayers to write off CASUALTY LOSSES going forward solely to ‘disaster areas’ as declared by the POTUS.

Say whaaaat ?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

Effective immediately this new restriction detailed in the US Tax Code WILL HARM ANYONE who falls victim to any tragedy that does not rise to a less than fully clear standard set by our beloved Twitter-In-Chief, aka #StableGenius (presently ‘trending’). Read More

Foreign Investors In United States Real Estate

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Real Estate And The Net Investment Income Tax And Self-Employment Tax.

If you are planning or are actually doing a real estate business, either as an investor or as an active participant, you will have to deal with the these:

Net Investment Income Tax: If you have net investment income and your modified adjusted gross income exceeds $250,000 for married persons filing jointly, then there is a 3.8% tax on the lesser of (1) your net investment income, or (2) the amount your modified adjusted gross exceeds the threshold amount.  Note that self-employment income is not net investment income. Read More

Am I At Risk For Being Audited?

Even though some IRS audits are chosen at random, there are a few factors that could put Texas taxpayers at an increased risk.

Taxpayers in Texas may understandably have a fear of being audited. After all, an Internal Revenue Service audit may be incredibly time-consuming and end in the consumer having to pay money to the government. However, that is not always the case. Read More

Top 10 Tax Provisions You May Not Have Heard In The News

Even though described as “Simplification,” the Ways and Means proposal is 82+ pages long and will likely expand during the markup Even if passed in 2017, the vast majority of changes will not be effective until 2018.

While the tax rate brackets will be simplified from seven to four, higher income taxpayers will occasionally find them in a higher bracket under the proposal than they would under current law. For example, an individual taxpayer with $200,001 to $424,950 in 2018 will jump to a 35% rate vs. 33% under current law. Likewise, a married couple with $260,001 to $424,950 will jump to 35% vs. 33%. Read More

Tax Time Has Arrived! Are You Ready?

If you’re like most taxpayers, you find yourself with an ominous stack of “homework” around TAX TIME! Pulling together the records for your tax appointment is never easy, but the effort usually pays off in the extra tax you save! When you arrive at your appointment fully prepared, you’ll have more time to:

  • Consider every possible legal deduction;
  • Evaluate which income reporting and deductions are best suited to your situation;
  • Explore current law changes that affect your tax status;
  • Talk about tax-planning alternatives that could reduce your future tax liability.

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Just A Few Pints Can Explain How The Tax System Works

Suppose that once a week, ten men go out for beer and the bill for all ten comes to £100. If they paid their bill the way we pay our taxes, it would go something like this.

The first four men (the poorest) would pay nothing.
 The fifth would pay £1. The sixth would pay £3. The seventh would pay £7. The eighth would pay £12. The ninth would pay £18. 
And the tenth man (the richest) would pay £59. Read More

Your Independent Contractors Can Get You Into Trouble

While most California employers are aware of the risks of misclassifying employees as “independent contractors”, a new California appellate decision named “SECCI v. United Independent Taxi Drivers, Cal.Rptr.3d ___ 2017, W.L. 605487, creates new concern for companies that use independent contractors. This concern is that even properly classified independent contractors may be deemed to be an agent of the employer which subjects the employer to vicarious liability for the acts of those contractors. Read More

Family Business: Partnership Mergers

In any successful family business there will likely come a time when descendants will want to take over the business from the older generation of owners. Usually, this will require that entities will need to be split into different business entities to accommodate both differences between the descendants (perhaps the descendants can’t cooperate with each other) or managing risk, so that high risk business can be separated from lower risk businesses and investments (construction business needs to be separated from investment assets such as stocks, bonds, annuity assets.) Read More

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