Archive for FBAR

Tax Delinquents May Have Passports Cancelled – Take 2!

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We previously posted on Thursday, May 31, 2012 Tax Delinquents May Have Passports Canceled & Be Questioned at Air & Sea Ports  where we discussed that almost unnoticed, Congress is close to approving a law under which the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) will be able to revoke the passports of Americans who owe substantial unpaid taxes. Nothing has happened until now.

A GAO report found that for the 2008 tax year, the State Department issued passports to more than 224,000 citizens who owed about $6 billion in tax. Most of it was for individual income taxes, and nearly two-thirds was more than three years old.  The biggest Tax Debtor owed $46.6 million and was part-owner of a professional sports team. Another owed nearly $40 million and had traveled to 10 foreign countries in the recent past. The report said that the IRS had filed tax liens against both individuals but large amounts of tax Read more

Part 11 – Understanding “Exit Taxes”

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S. 2801 of the Internal Revenue Code is NOT a S. 877A “Exit Tax”, but a punishment for the “sins of the father”

Updated September 12, 2015 – the IRS has issued “proposed rules”  governing the issue of “The sins of the father”.

The following was a comment on Part 9 of this “Exit Tax” series.

“I know many tax compliant, patriotic Americans who have renounced. Many have done so seeing the $2m threshold approaching, to protect their families and get on with their lives. All with heavy hearts.

You did not mention the additional burden on those who renounce who have US citizen relatives–the tax their Read more

Story of A Good Citizen Who Reports Foreign Bank Accounts But Forgets FBARs! Huh?

Manasa Nadig - 11-17-15

I have to say today’s blog post was triggered by a phone call a few weeks ago. The would-be client wanted to report his foreign bank accounts. Apparently, this good citizen had all his I’s dotted & T’s crossed – so to speak – so what was the problem you ask? I hate to say this, but it happens more than you would think. He did not know there were additional reporting requirements involved when it came to bank accounts in foreign financial institutions. (More on FBAR thresholds in my post here)

You have to know that the IRS will not impose a penalty for the failure to file the delinquent FBARs if you “properly” reported the foreign bank accounts on your US tax returns, and paid tax on the income from these accounts and have not been contacted by the IRS for an income tax examination or a request for the delinquent returns has not been made by them. Read more

Part 10 – Understanding “Exit Taxes”

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The S. 877A “Exit Tax” and possible treaty relief under the Canada US Tax Treaty

Introduction – The Canada U.S. Tax Treaty Does Not Always Prevent Double Taxation

See: Part 9 – Understanding “Exit Taxes” – For #Americansabroad: US “citizenship taxation” is “death by a thousand cuts”, but the S. 877A Exit Tax is “death by the guillotine”.

When countries independently make major changes in tax law, double taxation can occur.

The following comment from 5thSwiss on the Isaac Brock Society site explains why and how double taxation can be a reality. It also underscores the dangers of a U.S. citizen leaving the United States. Read more

FBAR Due Dates Align With Tax Returns

Larry Stolberg - 11-6-15

The SURFACE TRANSPORTATION ACT OF 2015 became law in late July, 2015. The tax provisions changed a number of due dates effective for tax years beginning after December 31, 2015 for partnerships, C corporations and S corporations. Surprisingly, was a change for FBARS or FINCEN114 that will now align commencing for the 2016 taxation year the FBAR (Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts) due date with the due date for individual returns, moving it from June 30 to April 15. The bill instructs the IRS to modify existing regulations to reflect the changes to tax return filing deadlines.

This will mean that for 2016 tax return filers the FBAR will be due April 15, 2017 which is the normal due date for U.S. persons residing in the U.S. on April 15th. It appears that alignment will also mean that the automatic extension to June 15 for those residing outside of the U.S. will be accepted as not late, but more importantly, it Read more

New Rules On Gifts & Inheritances From Expats Proposed By The IRS

Manasa Nadig - 9-23-15

We know that increasing globalization keeps us, Enrolled Agents, on our toes especially when we have to consider advising families, businesses and real property owners who have ties with the US and other countries as well. Thanks to my many clients who have business interests in other countries or still have ties/ families back in the countries they migrated from, I deal with cross-border issues quite often.

Interestingly, this summer we did a work-up for a client who had surrendered their green-card & left the country but due to their length of stay in the country, they could be considered “covered-expatriates”, the clients wanted to set up inheritances for their grand-children who are US citizens. Read more

Part 1 – “Facts Are Stubborn Things” – The Possible Effect of The US “Exit Tax” On Canadian Residents

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Although this series originally began on “April Fools Day”, I assure that this is NOT a joke.

This post will demonstrate how the U.S. “Exit Tax” affects “middle class Canadians who  have U.S. citizenship and wish to relinquish it. You will see how the “Exit Tax” imposes punitive taxes on Canadian assets and on income earned in Canada. You will also see how some U.S. assets are (in effect) exempted from the “Exit Tax”. We will learn from the example of a “Middle Class Canadian” with an average house in Toronto, a pension plan from the University of Toronto and a low value RRSP who decides that he no longer wishes to be a U.S. citizen.

This person has lived in Canada most (or perhaps all) of his adult life. You will see that he has NO U.S. assets and Read more

OVDP Penalty Increased To 50% For 48 Foreign Banks!

Ronald Marini picture1

The new revisions to the US offshore voluntary disclosure initiative, which we posted on 6/18/14 “IRS Makes Changes to Offshore Programs; Revisions Ease Burden and Help More Taxpayers Come into Compliance“, now provides for and increased 50% FBAR Penalties for ‘Willful’ Non-Disclosers. 

This group includes those individuals who have offshore bank accounts with a foreign financial institution which has been publicly identified as being under investigation, or is cooperating with a government investigation. IRS has published a list of those foreign financial institutions or facilitators.

The complete list is as follows, as of 9/16/15: Read more

How To Live Outside The United States In An FBAR And FATCA World

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When in Rome, live as a Homelander” does, when elsewhere, live as they live elsewhere.

Americans abroad are constantly told that they should “come clean”. They should file their U.S. taxes. This assumes that they are somehow “unclean” or perhaps “dirty”. The life of an “American abroad” is about three things:

1. “Thinking Clean” – The importance of “thinking clean” while living abroad. Read more

Impossible And Expensive To Be A US Tax Compliant Citizen Abroad

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Exit Tax Operates To Confiscate Assets Of Those Who Moved From The U.S. Years Ago; And On Assets Acquired After Leaving The U.S. (Including Non-U.S. Pensions)


Introducing Tax Expert and TaxConnections Internet Tax Summit Presenter: John Richardson, Citizenship Solutions, Toronto, Canada

Are you a “Covered Expatriate”?  Learn about this term and so much more regarding FATCA, FBAR and Exit Taxes from John Richardson on September 21st.  See his short introductory video below and get your free VIP Ticket to the Internet Tax Summit. Read more

I’m Sorry…

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In 1811, President James Madison started the Federal Conscience Fund, which allows guilt-ridden Americans to surreptitiously atone for their financial sins. Over the years, generous benefactors have achieved various levels of catharsis. Typical donors range from guilty individuals, such as a Massachusetts woman who mailed in nine cents, because she re-used three postage stamps, to a government contractor haunted by the ghosts of Christmas past who sent in some $400,000.

Predictably, many people send in offerings to clear their consciences “with the IRS and with God.” One anonymous woman generously offered a few hand-made quilts to settle her tax debt. But perhaps the best of all is a man who emptied his conscience by writing, “I cheated on my income taxes and haven’t been able to sleep. So, I enclose a cashier’s Read more