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Archive for FBAR Filing

The FBAR For United States Citizens And Residents Is Due Today, Oct 15th – What About Business Visitors?

The FBAR For United States Citizens And Residents Is Due Today, Oct 15th - What About Business Visitors?

Update 2020 …

Prologue: Circa 1948 – George Orwell anticipates the arrival of Mr. FBAR

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Report Of Foreign Bank And Financial Accounts (FBAR)

Report Of Foreign Bank And Financial Accounts (FBAR)

Every year, under the law known as the Bank Secrecy Act, you must report certain foreign financial accounts, such as bank accounts, brokerage accounts and mutual funds, to the Treasury Department and keep certain records of those accounts. You report the accounts by filing a Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR) on FinCEN Form 114.

Who Must File

A United States person, including a citizen, resident, corporation, partnership, limited liability company, trust and estate, must file an FBAR to report:

  1. a financial interest in or signature or other authority over at least one financial account located outside the United States if
  2. the aggregate value of those foreign financial accounts exceeded $10,000 at any time during the calendar year reported.

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When Do You Need To File An FBAR?

When Do You Need To File An FBAR?

According to the IRS, a U.S. citizen, resident, corporation, partnership, limited liability company, trust, and estate, must file an FBAR if they meet certain criteria.  These requirements can include: if you have a financial interest in or authority over at least one foreign financial account and if the combined value of the foreign accounts exceeds $10,000 at any time during the calendar year.

When you have foreign bank accounts, there are certain situations in which seeking help from a tax attorney can be beneficial.  In addition to getting information on how to file an FBAR, a tax attorney can help you with the following:

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Understand How To Report Foreign Bank And Financial Accounts

IRS LOGO

In a global economy, many people in the United States have foreign financial accounts. The law requires U.S. persons with foreign financial accounts to report their accounts to the U.S. Treasury Department, even if the accounts don’t generate any taxable income. They need to report by April 15 of the following calendar year.

The U.S. government requires reporting of foreign financial accounts because foreign financial institutions may not be subject to the same reporting requirements as domestic financial institutions.

Who Needs To Report

Since 1970, the Bank Secrecy Act requires U.S. persons to file a Report of Foreign Bank and Financial Accounts (FBAR) if they have:

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How Could The IRS Find Out That I Am Not Tax Compliant As An Expat?

Olivier Wagner

You’re living your adventure and you’re settled in your new home, having non-US bank accounts, a non-US employer and a non-US social life. You have limited ties with the US and since the people who pay you (banks, employer) are not in touch with the IRS, you consider simply not filing US tax return. What could go wrong?

As you might know, on some level… US citizens are required to report their worldwide income on a US tax return, regardless of where they live.

Think AGAIN…

IRS has a few proven ways they use to track people down.

Below you will find the most common ways that IRS can track you down and check if you filed your US tax return, no matter where you live in the World.

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How To File An FBAR For Previous Tax Years

Venar Ayar On FBAR Filings

You have three major option for filing Foreign Bank Account Reports (FBARs) for previous tax years. The best option for you will depend on the specific facts of your case, such as:

  • Whether you failed to report foreign income during the tax years in question.
  • Whether your failure to file was willful or non-willful.
  • Your risk tolerance.
  • How much the estimated amount of penalties will be when using the Streamlined Procedure or the new Offshore Disclosure Framework.

Consult a tax attorney before you use any type of offshore disclosure method to make sure you are correctly following IRS procedures.

Delinquent FBAR Submission

This method involves simply sending in the delinquent FBARs. You don’t pay any penalties and you don’t have to amend your tax returns.

You can only use this strategy if you are not under civil examination or criminal investigation by the IRS and have not been contacted about the delinquent FBARs. You won’t owe any penalties if you didn’t have foreign income or paid tax on your foreign income during the years you failed to file FBARs.

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